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Article

Vaccine Hesitancy in the Age of Coronavirus and Fake News: Analysis of Journalistic Sources in the Spanish Quality Press

1
Department of Communication Studies, University Carlos III of Madrid, 28903 Madrid, Spain
2
Health Research Centre, University of Almeria, 04120 Almeria, Spain
3
Research Group for Analysis and Anticipation Journalism, University of Nebrija, 20240 Madrid, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 8136; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17218136
Received: 13 October 2020 / Revised: 28 October 2020 / Accepted: 29 October 2020 / Published: 4 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Collection Mass Communication, Digital Media, and Public Health)
The study of the quality press and the use of sources is relevant to understand the role of journalists in scientific controversies. The objective was to examine media sourcing patterns, using the case of vaccines as a backdrop. Articles were retrieved from the national quality press in Spain. Content analysis was undertaken on the sources and on other variables such as tone, frames and journalistic genre. The software myNews and NVivo were used for data collection and coding, while SPSS and Excel were used for statistical analysis. Findings indicate that sources related to the government, professional associations and scientific companies are the most frequently used, confirming the central role of government institutions as journalistic sources. These were followed by university scientists, scientific journals and clinicians. On the other hand, NGOs and patients groups were included in fewer than 5% of the articles. More than 30% included none or just one source expressing unbalanced perspectives. Frequent use of certain source types, particularly governmental, may indicate state structures of power. The study provides a better understanding of journalistic routines in the coverage of vaccines, including fresh perspectives in the current COVID-19 pandemic. View Full-Text
Keywords: content analysis; media; newspaper; public health; sources; journalism; vaccine content analysis; media; newspaper; public health; sources; journalism; vaccine
MDPI and ACS Style

Catalan-Matamoros, D.; Elías, C. Vaccine Hesitancy in the Age of Coronavirus and Fake News: Analysis of Journalistic Sources in the Spanish Quality Press. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 8136. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17218136

AMA Style

Catalan-Matamoros D, Elías C. Vaccine Hesitancy in the Age of Coronavirus and Fake News: Analysis of Journalistic Sources in the Spanish Quality Press. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(21):8136. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17218136

Chicago/Turabian Style

Catalan-Matamoros, Daniel, and Carlos Elías. 2020. "Vaccine Hesitancy in the Age of Coronavirus and Fake News: Analysis of Journalistic Sources in the Spanish Quality Press" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 21: 8136. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17218136

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