Next Article in Journal
Trajectories of Depressive Symptoms among Multicultural Adolescents in Korea: Longitudinal Analysis Using Latent Class Growth Model
Next Article in Special Issue
Teachers’ Psychological Needs Satisfaction and Thwarting: Can They Explain Students’ Behavioural Engagement in Physical Education? A Multi-Level Analysis
Previous Article in Journal
Characteristics of Early Mother–Infant and Father–Infant Interactions: A Comparison between Assisted Reproductive Technology and Spontaneous Conceiving Parents
Previous Article in Special Issue
Gender, Physical Self-Perception and Overall Physical Fitness in Secondary School Students: A Multiple Mediation Model
Article

Acute Effects of High-Intensity Interval Training on Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor, Cortisol and Working Memory in Physical Education College Students

1
Department of Physical Education and Sport, University of Seville, E-41013 Seville, Spain
2
Virgen del Rocío University Hospital, E-41013 Seville, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 8216; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17218216
Received: 10 September 2020 / Revised: 24 October 2020 / Accepted: 3 November 2020 / Published: 6 November 2020
High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is considered one of the most effective methods for improving cardiorespiratory and metabolic functions. However, it is necessary to clarify their effects on neurophysiological responses and coginitive functioning. Thus, this study aimed to determine the effects of an acute bout of HIIT on neurocognitive and stress-related biomarkers and their association with working memory (WM) capacity in healthy young adults. Twenty-five male college students performed a single bout of HIIT consisting of 10 × 1 min of cycling at their VO2 peak power output. Plasma Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and cortisol (CORT) levels, and WM (Digit Span Test (DST)), were assessed pre-, post- and 30 min post-intervention. Significant post-exercise increases in circulating BDNF and CORT levels were observed coinciding with the highest DST performance; however, no statistical associations were found between cognitive and neurophysiological variables. Moreover, DST scores obtained 30 min after exercise remained higher than those assessed at pre-exercise. In conclusion, the stress induced by a single bout of HIIT induces a remarkable response of BDNF and CORT boosting WM capacity in healthy young males. Future research should clarify the association between cognitive and neurobiological markers during intense exercise stimulation. View Full-Text
Keywords: exercise; HIIT; neurotrophins; stress responses; cognition; executive functions exercise; HIIT; neurotrophins; stress responses; cognition; executive functions
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Martínez-Díaz, I.C.; Escobar-Muñoz, M.C.; Carrasco, L. Acute Effects of High-Intensity Interval Training on Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor, Cortisol and Working Memory in Physical Education College Students. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 8216. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17218216

AMA Style

Martínez-Díaz IC, Escobar-Muñoz MC, Carrasco L. Acute Effects of High-Intensity Interval Training on Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor, Cortisol and Working Memory in Physical Education College Students. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(21):8216. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17218216

Chicago/Turabian Style

Martínez-Díaz, Inmaculada C., María C. Escobar-Muñoz, and Luis Carrasco. 2020. "Acute Effects of High-Intensity Interval Training on Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor, Cortisol and Working Memory in Physical Education College Students" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 21: 8216. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17218216

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop