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Article

The Health Consequences of Neocolonialism for Latin American Immigrant Women Working as Caregivers in Spain: A Multisite Qualitative Analysis

1
GESEC Group, Department of Nursing and Physiotherapy, University of Lleida, 25198 Lleida, Spain
2
Grup de Recerca en Cures de la Salut, Institut de Recerca Biomèdica de Lleida, 25198 Lleida, Spain
3
Global Migration and Health Initiative, Toronto, ON M5T 1P8, Canada
4
Health Sciences Department (Occupational Therapy), Faculty of Health Sciences, University of A Coruña, 15006 A Coruña, Spain
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Ciber Fragilidad y Envejecimiento Saludable (CIBERFES), 28029 Madrid, Spain
6
Department of Nursing and Physiotherapy, University of Illes Balears, 07122 Mallorca, Spain
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Department of Philosophy and Social Work, University of Illes Balears, 07122 Mallorca, Spain
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Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5T 1P8, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 8278; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17218278
Received: 20 September 2020 / Revised: 1 November 2020 / Accepted: 6 November 2020 / Published: 9 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Health and Wellbeing of Migrant Populations)
In Spain, most jobs available for Latin American immigrant women are in intimate labour (caregiving and domestic work). This work is usually performed under informal employment conditions. The objective of this study was to explain how the colonial logic mediates the experiences of Latin American women working in intimate labour in Spain, and the effects of such occupation on their health and wellbeing, using a decolonial theoretical framework. A multi-site secondary data analysis of qualitative data from four previous studies was performed utilizing 101 interviews with Latin American immigrant women working as caregivers in Spain. Three interwoven categories show how the dominant colonial logic in Spain creates low social status and precarious jobs, and naturalizes intimate labour as their métier while producing detrimental physical and psychosocial health consequences for these immigrant caregivers. The caregivers displayed several strategies to resist and navigate intimate labour and manage its negative impact on health. Respect and integration into the family for whom they work had a buffering effect, mediating the effects of working conditions on health and wellbeing. Based on our analysis, we suggest that employment, social, and health protection laws and strategies are needed to promote a positive working environment, and to reduce the impact of caregiving work for Latin American caregivers. View Full-Text
Keywords: migration; working women; workplace; social discrimination; racism; sexism; qualitative research; economic recession; Spain; caregiving migration; working women; workplace; social discrimination; racism; sexism; qualitative research; economic recession; Spain; caregiving
MDPI and ACS Style

Briones-Vozmediano, E.; Rivas-Quarneti, N.; Gea-Sánchez, M.; Bover-Bover, A.; Carbonero, M.A.; Gastaldo, D. The Health Consequences of Neocolonialism for Latin American Immigrant Women Working as Caregivers in Spain: A Multisite Qualitative Analysis. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 8278. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17218278

AMA Style

Briones-Vozmediano E, Rivas-Quarneti N, Gea-Sánchez M, Bover-Bover A, Carbonero MA, Gastaldo D. The Health Consequences of Neocolonialism for Latin American Immigrant Women Working as Caregivers in Spain: A Multisite Qualitative Analysis. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(21):8278. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17218278

Chicago/Turabian Style

Briones-Vozmediano, Erica, Natalia Rivas-Quarneti, Montserrat Gea-Sánchez, Andreu Bover-Bover, Maria A. Carbonero, and Denise Gastaldo. 2020. "The Health Consequences of Neocolonialism for Latin American Immigrant Women Working as Caregivers in Spain: A Multisite Qualitative Analysis" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 21: 8278. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17218278

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