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Article

Food Insecurity in the Post-Hurricane Harvey Setting: Risks and Resources in the Midst of Uncertainty

1
Department of Sociology and Criminology, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701, USA
2
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Fayetteville, AR 72701, USA
3
Department of Communications, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701, USA
4
Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Fayetteville, AR 72701, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(22), 8424; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17228424
Received: 16 October 2020 / Revised: 9 November 2020 / Accepted: 11 November 2020 / Published: 13 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Disasters and Their Consequences for Public Health)
Food insecurity is of heightened concern during and after natural disasters; higher prevalence is typically reported in post-disaster settings. The current study examines food insecurity prevalence and specific risk/resource variables that may act as barriers or advantages in accessing food in such a setting. Using a modified quota sample (n = 316), Hurricane Harvey survivors participated in face-to-face interviews and/or online surveys that assessed health, social and household factors, and sociodemographic characteristics. Using logistic regression analyses we find that social vulnerabilities, circumstantial risk, and social and psychological resources are important in determining the odds of food insecurity. Hispanic and/or Nonwhite survivors, renters, and those persons displaced during the natural disaster have higher food insecurity odds. Survivors with stronger social ties, higher levels of mastery, and a greater sense of connectedness to their community are found to have lower food insecurity odds. A more nuanced analysis of circumstantial risk finds that while the independent effects of displacement and home ownership are important, so too is the intersection of these two factors, with displaced-renters experiencing significantly higher odds than any other residence and displacement combinations, and particularly those who are homeowners not displaced during the disaster. Strategies for addressing differential risks, as well as practical approaches for implementation and education programming related to disaster recovery, are discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: food insecurity; natural disasters; risks and resources; hurricane Harvey food insecurity; natural disasters; risks and resources; hurricane Harvey
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MDPI and ACS Style

Fitzpatrick, K.M.; Willis, D.E.; Spialek, M.L.; English, E. Food Insecurity in the Post-Hurricane Harvey Setting: Risks and Resources in the Midst of Uncertainty. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 8424. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17228424

AMA Style

Fitzpatrick KM, Willis DE, Spialek ML, English E. Food Insecurity in the Post-Hurricane Harvey Setting: Risks and Resources in the Midst of Uncertainty. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(22):8424. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17228424

Chicago/Turabian Style

Fitzpatrick, Kevin M., Don E. Willis, Matthew L. Spialek, and Emily English. 2020. "Food Insecurity in the Post-Hurricane Harvey Setting: Risks and Resources in the Midst of Uncertainty" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 22: 8424. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17228424

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