Next Article in Journal
The Association between Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Stroke: Results from the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study (KoGES)
Next Article in Special Issue
Response Activity in Mixed-Method Survey Data Collection—The Methods Used in a Survey among the Foreign-Born Population in Finland (FinMonik)
Previous Article in Journal
Psychological Effects of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Hungarian Adults
Article

In the Subtropical Monsoon Climate High-Density City, What Features of the Neighborhood Environment Matter Most for Public Health?

by , , , and *
College of Forestry and Landscape Architecture, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510640, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Both authors contributed equally to this work.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(24), 9566; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17249566
Received: 16 November 2020 / Revised: 10 December 2020 / Accepted: 18 December 2020 / Published: 21 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Data and Methods for Monitoring and Decisions in Public Health)
Urbanization and climate change have been rapidly occurring globally. Evidence-based healthy city development is required to improve living quality and mitigate the adverse impact of the outdoor neighborhood environment on public health. Taking Guangzhou as an example to explore the association of neighborhood environment and public health and preferably to offer some implications for better future city development, we measured ten environmental factors (temperature (T), wind-chill index (WCI), thermal stress index (HSI), relative humidity (RH), average wind speed (AWS), negative oxygen ions (NOI), PM2.5, luminous flux (LF), and illuminance (I)) in four seasons in four typical neighborhoods, and the SF-36 health scale was employed to assess the physical and mental health of neighborhood residents in nine subscales (health transition(HT), physiological functions (PF), general health status (GH), physical pain (BP), physiological functions (RP), energy vitality (VT), mental health (MH), social function (SF), and emotional functions (RE)). The linear mixed model was used in an analysis of variance. We ranked the different environmental factors in relation to aspects of health and weighted them accordingly. Generally, the thermal environment had the greatest impact on both physical and mental health and the atmospheric environment and wind environment had the least impact on physical health and mental health, respectively. In addition, the physical health of the resident was more greatly affected by the environment than mental health. According to the results, we make a number of strategic suggestions for the renewal of the outdoor neighborhood environment in subtropical monsoon climate high-density cities and provide a theoretical basis for improving public health through landscape architecture at the neighborhood scale. View Full-Text
Keywords: landscape architecture; environmental factor; correlation study; physical health; mental health; urban regeneration landscape architecture; environmental factor; correlation study; physical health; mental health; urban regeneration
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Gao, W.; Tu, R.; Li, H.; Fang, Y.; Que, Q. In the Subtropical Monsoon Climate High-Density City, What Features of the Neighborhood Environment Matter Most for Public Health? Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 9566. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17249566

AMA Style

Gao W, Tu R, Li H, Fang Y, Que Q. In the Subtropical Monsoon Climate High-Density City, What Features of the Neighborhood Environment Matter Most for Public Health? International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(24):9566. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17249566

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gao, Wei, Ruoxiang Tu, Hao Li, Yongli Fang, and Qingmin Que. 2020. "In the Subtropical Monsoon Climate High-Density City, What Features of the Neighborhood Environment Matter Most for Public Health?" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 24: 9566. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17249566

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop