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Article

Health Promotion Interventions: Lessons from the Transfer of Good Practices in CHRODIS-PLUS

1
EuroHealthNet, 1000 Brussels, Belgium
2
National Institute for Health and Welfare, FI-00271 Helsinki, Finland
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(4), 1281; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17041281
Received: 22 December 2019 / Revised: 11 February 2020 / Accepted: 15 February 2020 / Published: 17 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Implementation of Interventions in Public Health)
Health promotion and disease prevention often take the form of population- and individual-based interventions that aim to reduce the burden of disease and associated risk factors. There is a wealth of programs, policies, and procedures that have been proven to work in a specific context with potential to improve the lives and quality of life for many people. However, the challenge facing health promotion is how to transfer recognized good practices from one context to another. We present findings from the use of the implementation framework developed in the Joint Action project CHRODIS-PLUS to support the transfer of health promotion interventions for children’s health and older adults identified previously as good practices. We explore the contextual success factors and barriers in the use of an implementation framework in local contexts and the protocol for supporting the implementation. The paper concludes by discussing the key learning points and the development of the next steps for successful transfer of health promotion interventions. View Full-Text
Keywords: health promotion; disease prevention; intervention; implementation; good practice; children; adults; transfer health promotion; disease prevention; intervention; implementation; good practice; children; adults; transfer
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MDPI and ACS Style

Barnfield, A.; Savolainen, N.; Lounamaa, A. Health Promotion Interventions: Lessons from the Transfer of Good Practices in CHRODIS-PLUS. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 1281. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17041281

AMA Style

Barnfield A, Savolainen N, Lounamaa A. Health Promotion Interventions: Lessons from the Transfer of Good Practices in CHRODIS-PLUS. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(4):1281. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17041281

Chicago/Turabian Style

Barnfield, Andrew, Nella Savolainen, and Anne Lounamaa. 2020. "Health Promotion Interventions: Lessons from the Transfer of Good Practices in CHRODIS-PLUS" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 4: 1281. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17041281

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