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Brief Report

Adolescents’ Cyber Victimization: The Influence of Technologies, Gender, and Gender Stereotype Traits

1
Department of Psychology, Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA 16802, USA
2
Faculty of Social Studies, Masaryk University, 60200 Brno, Czechia
3
Department of Educational Studies, University of Potsdam, 14476 Potsdam, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(4), 1293; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17041293
Received: 6 January 2020 / Revised: 12 February 2020 / Accepted: 13 February 2020 / Published: 17 February 2020
The purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of gender and gender stereotype traits (masculinity, femininity) in cyber victimization behaviors (cyber relational victimization, cyber verbal victimization, hacking) through different technologies (mobile phones, gaming consoles, social networking sites). There were 456 8th graders (226 females; M age = 13.66, SD = 0.41) from two midwestern middle schools in the United States included in this study. They completed questionnaires on their endorsement of masculine and feminine traits, and self-reported cyber victimization through different technologies. The findings revealed main effects of types of cyber victimization for boys and of technology for girls. In particular, boys with feminine traits experienced the most victimization by cyber verbal aggression, cyber relational aggression, and hacking when compared to the other groups of boys. Girls with feminine traits experienced the most cyber victimization through social networking sites, gaming consoles, and mobile phones in comparison to the other groups of girls. For girls with feminine traits, they reported more cyber relational victimization and cyber verbal victimization through mobile phones and social networking sites, as well as more hacking via social networking sites. Such findings underscore the importance of considering gender stereotype traits, types of victimization, and technologies when examining cyber victimization. View Full-Text
Keywords: gender; gender stereotype trait; cyber victimization; technology gender; gender stereotype trait; cyber victimization; technology
MDPI and ACS Style

Wright, M.F.; Wachs, S. Adolescents’ Cyber Victimization: The Influence of Technologies, Gender, and Gender Stereotype Traits. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 1293. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17041293

AMA Style

Wright MF, Wachs S. Adolescents’ Cyber Victimization: The Influence of Technologies, Gender, and Gender Stereotype Traits. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(4):1293. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17041293

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wright, Michelle F., and Sebastian Wachs. 2020. "Adolescents’ Cyber Victimization: The Influence of Technologies, Gender, and Gender Stereotype Traits" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 4: 1293. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17041293

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