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Review

Lesson from Ecotoxicity: Revisiting the Microbial Lipopeptides for the Management of Emerging Diseases for Crop Protection

1
Plant-Microbe Interaction and Rhizosphere Biology Lab, ICAR-National Bureau of Agriculturally Important Microorganisms, Maunath Bhanjan 275103, India
2
Pilgram Marpeck School of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics, Truett McConnel University, 100 Alumni Dr., Cleveland, GA 30528, USA
3
Department of Mycology and Plant Pathology, Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005, India
4
Department of Agricultural Microbiology, University of Agricultural Sciences, GKVK, Bengaluru, Karnataka 560065, India
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These two authors contributed equally and commonly share first authorship.
These two authors contributed equally.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(4), 1434; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17041434
Received: 30 December 2019 / Revised: 18 February 2020 / Accepted: 19 February 2020 / Published: 23 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microorganisms in the Environment)
Microorganisms area treasure in terms of theproduction of various bioactive compounds which are being explored in different arenas of applied sciences. In agriculture, microbes and their bioactive compounds are being utilized in growth promotion and health promotion withnutrient fortification and its acquisition. Exhaustive explorations are unraveling the vast diversity of microbialcompounds with their potential usage in solving multiferous problems incrop production. Lipopeptides are one of such microbial compounds which havestrong antimicrobial properties against different plant pathogens. These compounds are reported to be produced by bacteria, cyanobacteria, fungi, and few other microorganisms; however, genus Bacillus alone produces a majority of diverse lipopeptides. Lipopeptides are low molecular weight compounds which havemultiple industrial roles apart from being usedas biosurfactants and antimicrobials. In plant protection, lipopeptides have wide prospects owing totheirpore-forming ability in pathogens, siderophore activity, biofilm inhibition, and dislodging activity, preventing colonization bypathogens, antiviral activity, etc. Microbes with lipopeptides that haveall these actions are good biocontrol agents. Exploring these antimicrobial compounds could widen the vistasof biological pest control for existing and emerging plant pathogens. The broader diversity and strong antimicrobial behavior of lipopeptides could be a boon for dealing withcomplex pathosystems and controlling diseases of greater economic importance. Understanding which and how these compounds modulate the synthesis and production of defense-related biomolecules in the plants is a key question—the answer of whichneeds in-depth investigation. The present reviewprovides a comprehensive picture of important lipopeptides produced by plant microbiome, their isolation, characterization, mechanisms of disease control, behavior against phytopathogens to understand different aspects of antagonism, and potential prospects for future explorations as antimicrobial agents. Understanding and exploring the antimicrobial lipopeptides from bacteria and fungi could also open upan entire new arena of biopesticides for effective control of devastating plant diseases. View Full-Text
Keywords: lipopeptides; Bacillus spp.; biosurfactant; antimicrobials; biocontrol lipopeptides; Bacillus spp.; biosurfactant; antimicrobials; biocontrol
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MDPI and ACS Style

Malviya, D.; Sahu, P.K.; Singh, U.B.; Paul, S.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, A.R.; Singh, S.; Kumar, M.; Paul, D.; Rai, J.P.; Singh, H.V.; Brahmaprakash, G.P. Lesson from Ecotoxicity: Revisiting the Microbial Lipopeptides for the Management of Emerging Diseases for Crop Protection. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 1434. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17041434

AMA Style

Malviya D, Sahu PK, Singh UB, Paul S, Gupta A, Gupta AR, Singh S, Kumar M, Paul D, Rai JP, Singh HV, Brahmaprakash GP. Lesson from Ecotoxicity: Revisiting the Microbial Lipopeptides for the Management of Emerging Diseases for Crop Protection. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(4):1434. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17041434

Chicago/Turabian Style

Malviya, Deepti, Pramod K. Sahu, Udai B. Singh, Surinder Paul, Amrita Gupta, Abhay R. Gupta, Shailendra Singh, Manoj Kumar, Diby Paul, Jai P. Rai, Harsh V. Singh, and G. P. Brahmaprakash 2020. "Lesson from Ecotoxicity: Revisiting the Microbial Lipopeptides for the Management of Emerging Diseases for Crop Protection" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 4: 1434. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17041434

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