Next Article in Journal
Reliability of 30-s Chair Stand Test with and without Cognitive Task in People with Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus
Next Article in Special Issue
The Evidence-Based Development of an Intervention to Improve Clinical Health Literacy Practice
Previous Article in Journal
Work–Family Conflict and Job Outcomes for Construction Professionals: The Mediating Role of Affective Organizational Commitment
Previous Article in Special Issue
Making a Case for “Education for Health Literacy”: An International Perspective
Article

How Did Parents View the Impact of the Curriculum-Based HealthLit4Kids Program Beyond the Classroom?

1
School of Medicine, College of Health and Medicine, The University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS 7005, Australia
2
School of Education, College of Arts, Law and Education, The University of Tasmania, Launceston, TAS 7250, Australia
3
College of Education, Psychology and Social Work, Flinders University, Bedford Park, SA 5042, Australia
4
Centre for Global Health and Equity, Faculty of Health, Arts and Design, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC 3122, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(4), 1449; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17041449
Received: 15 January 2020 / Revised: 18 February 2020 / Accepted: 20 February 2020 / Published: 24 February 2020
The HealthLit4Kids program aims to build health literacy in a participatory and contextually relevant way. Whole-of-school and curriculum strategies aim to empower and build capacity to make informed health choices amongst students, teachers, parents, and their local community. The aim of this study was to evaluate the HealthLit4Kids program from the perspective of parents, using a Self-Determination Theory framework. This is one component within a larger evaluation of the program. Parents at four Australian primary schools were interviewed post-program. Qualitative data collected through parent interviews were analyzed thematically to identify themes, and coding checks were completed by experienced qualitative researchers. The three key themes identified were student engagement, behaviour change, and parent engagement. Findings also indicated that parents placed a high value on effective communication from schools and raised a range of health areas such as food and nutrition, physical activity, and mental health with the interviewer. Parent opinions of the HealthLit4Kids program were positive, with many reporting a perceived increase in their children’s ability to understand, communicate and act on health-related knowledge at home. The HealthLit4Kids program requires further research to determine its viability as an optimal pedagogical strategy for the health literacy development of primary school-aged children. View Full-Text
Keywords: healthlit4kids; health literacy; parent perceptions; curriculum; health education healthlit4kids; health literacy; parent perceptions; curriculum; health education
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Nash, R.; Cruickshank, V.; Flittner, A.; Mainsbridge, C.; Pill, S.; Elmer, S. How Did Parents View the Impact of the Curriculum-Based HealthLit4Kids Program Beyond the Classroom? Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 1449. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17041449

AMA Style

Nash R, Cruickshank V, Flittner A, Mainsbridge C, Pill S, Elmer S. How Did Parents View the Impact of the Curriculum-Based HealthLit4Kids Program Beyond the Classroom? International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(4):1449. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17041449

Chicago/Turabian Style

Nash, Rosie, Vaughan Cruickshank, Anna Flittner, Casey Mainsbridge, Shane Pill, and Shandell Elmer. 2020. "How Did Parents View the Impact of the Curriculum-Based HealthLit4Kids Program Beyond the Classroom?" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 4: 1449. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17041449

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop