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Article

Geochemical, Mineralogical and Morphological Characterisation of Road Dust and Associated Health Risks

1
Geobiosciences, Geotechnologies and Geoengineering Research Centre (GeoBioTec), Department of Geosciences, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
2
Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies (CESAM), Department of Environment, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
3
School of Technology and Management (ESTG), Polytechnic Institute of Viana do Castelo, Avenida do Atlântico, nº 644, 4900-348 Viana do Castelo, Portugal
4
LNEG, National Laboratory of Energy and Geology, Rua da Amieira, 4466-901 São Mamede de Infesta, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(5), 1563; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17051563
Received: 20 January 2020 / Revised: 24 February 2020 / Accepted: 26 February 2020 / Published: 28 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Integrated human exposure to air pollution)
Road dust resuspension, especially the particulate matter fraction below 10 µm (PM10), is one of the main air quality management challenges in Europe. Road dust samples were collected from representative streets (suburban and urban) of the city of Viana do Castelo, Portugal. PM10 emission factors (mg veh−1 km−1) ranging from 49 (asphalt) to 330 (cobble stone) were estimated by means of the United Stated Environmental Protection Agency method. Two road dust fractions (<0.074 mm and from 0.0074 to 1 mm) were characterised for their geochemical, mineralogical and morphological properties. In urban streets, road dusts reveal the contribution from traffic emissions, with higher concentrations of, for example, Cu, Zn and Pb. In the suburban area, agriculture practices likely contributed to As concentrations of 180 mg kg−1 in the finest road dust fraction. Samples are primarily composed of quartz, but also of muscovite, albite, kaolinite, microcline, Fe-enstatite, graphite and amorphous content. Particle morphology clearly shows the link with natural and traffic related materials, with well-formed minerals and irregular aggregates. The hazard quotient suggests a probability to induce non-carcinogenic adverse health effects in children by ingestion of Zr. Arsenic in the suburban street represents a human health risk of 1.58 × 10−4. View Full-Text
Keywords: road dust; traffic; PM10 emission factors; enrichment index; human health risk road dust; traffic; PM10 emission factors; enrichment index; human health risk
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MDPI and ACS Style

Candeias, C.; Vicente, E.; Tomé, M.; Rocha, F.; Ávila, P.; Célia, A. Geochemical, Mineralogical and Morphological Characterisation of Road Dust and Associated Health Risks. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 1563. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17051563

AMA Style

Candeias C, Vicente E, Tomé M, Rocha F, Ávila P, Célia A. Geochemical, Mineralogical and Morphological Characterisation of Road Dust and Associated Health Risks. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(5):1563. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17051563

Chicago/Turabian Style

Candeias, Carla, Estela Vicente, Mário Tomé, Fernando Rocha, Paula Ávila, and Alves Célia. 2020. "Geochemical, Mineralogical and Morphological Characterisation of Road Dust and Associated Health Risks" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 5: 1563. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17051563

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