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Article

Psychophysiological Stress Response in an Underwater Evacuation Training

1
Psychophysiological Research Group, European University of Madrid, Tajo Street, s/n, 28670 Madrid, Spain
2
Faculty of Sports Sciences, University of Extremadura, Av. de la Universidad, S/N, 10003 Cáceres, Spain
3
Faculty of Sports Sciences, Universidad Europea de Madrid, Tajo Street, s/n, 28670 Madrid, Spain
4
Grupo de Investigación en Cultura, Educación y Sociedad, Universidad de la Costa, 080002 Barranquilla, Colombia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(7), 2307; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17072307
Received: 12 March 2020 / Revised: 25 March 2020 / Accepted: 26 March 2020 / Published: 30 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychophysiological Responses to Stress)
Background: This research aimed to analyze the psychophysiological stress response of air crews in an underwater evacuation training. Materials and Methods: We analyzed in 36 participants (39.06 ± 9.01 years) modifications in the rating of perceived exertion (RPE), subjective stress perception (SSP), heart rate (HR), blood oxygen saturation (BOS), cortical arousal (critical flicker fusion threshold, CFFT), heart rate variability (HRV), spirometry, isometric hand strength (IHS), and short-term memory (ST-M) before and after an underwater evacuation training. Results: The maneuver produced a significant (p ≤ 0.05) increase in the SSP, RPE, Mean HR and maximum HR (Max HR), and a decrease in minimum HR (Min HR) and HRV. Conclusion: An underwater evacuation training produced an increase in the sympathetic nervous system modulation, elevating the psychophysiological stress response of the air crews, not negatively affecting their cortical arousal. View Full-Text
Keywords: stress; military; aircrew; accident; cortical arousal; heart rate variability stress; military; aircrew; accident; cortical arousal; heart rate variability
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MDPI and ACS Style

Vicente-Rodríguez, M.; Fuentes-Garcia, J.P.; Clemente-Suárez, V.J. Psychophysiological Stress Response in an Underwater Evacuation Training. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 2307. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17072307

AMA Style

Vicente-Rodríguez M, Fuentes-Garcia JP, Clemente-Suárez VJ. Psychophysiological Stress Response in an Underwater Evacuation Training. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(7):2307. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17072307

Chicago/Turabian Style

Vicente-Rodríguez, Marta, Juan P. Fuentes-Garcia, and Vicente J. Clemente-Suárez 2020. "Psychophysiological Stress Response in an Underwater Evacuation Training" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 7: 2307. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17072307

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