Next Article in Journal
Exploring the Determinants of the Severity of Pedestrian Injuries by Pedestrian Age: A Case Study of Daegu Metropolitan City, South Korea
Next Article in Special Issue
The Agreement between Patients’ and Healthcare Professionals’ Assessment of Patients’ Health Literacy—A Systematic Review
Previous Article in Journal
Effect of Molybdenum on Plant Physiology and Cadmium Uptake and Translocation in Rape (Brassica napus L.) under Different Levels of Cadmium Stress
Previous Article in Special Issue
Health Literacy among Health and Social Care University Students
Article

Considering Health Literacy, Health Decision Making, and Health Communication in the Social Networks of Vulnerable New Mothers in Hawai‘i: A Pilot Feasibility Study

1
Office of Public Health Studies, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA
2
Community and Cultural Psychology Department, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA
3
John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawai‘i, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA
4
School of Nursing and Dental Hygiene, University of Hawai‘i School of Nursing and Dental Hygiene, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(7), 2356; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17072356
Received: 1 February 2020 / Revised: 22 March 2020 / Accepted: 26 March 2020 / Published: 31 March 2020
Health literacy is understudied in the context of social networks. Our pilot study goal was to consider this research gap among vulnerable, low-income mothers of minority ethnic background in the state of Hawai‘i, USA. Recruitment followed a modified snowball sampling approach. First, we identified and interviewed seven mothers (“egos”) in a state-sponsored home visiting program. We then sought to interview individuals whom each mother said was part of her health decision-making network (“first-level alters”) and all individuals whom the first-level alters said were part of their health decision-making networks (“second-level alters”). Health literacy was self-reported using a validated item. A total of 18 people were interviewed, including all mothers (n = 7), 35% of the first-level alters (n = 7/20), and 36% of the second-level alters (n = 4/11). On average, the mothers made health decisions with 2.9 people (range: 1-6); partners/spouses and mothers/mothers-in-law were most common. One mother had low health literacy; her two first-level alters also had low health literacy. Across the full sample, the average number of people in individuals’ health decision networks was 2.5 (range: 0–7); 39% of those interviewed had low health literacy. This can inform the design of future studies and successful interventions to improve health literacy. View Full-Text
Keywords: health literacy; social networks; health communication; native Hawaiian mothers; Filipino mothers; low-income mothers health literacy; social networks; health communication; native Hawaiian mothers; Filipino mothers; low-income mothers
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Sentell, T.; Agner, J.; Pitt, R.; Davis, J.; Guo, M.; McFarlane, E. Considering Health Literacy, Health Decision Making, and Health Communication in the Social Networks of Vulnerable New Mothers in Hawai‘i: A Pilot Feasibility Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 2356. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17072356

AMA Style

Sentell T, Agner J, Pitt R, Davis J, Guo M, McFarlane E. Considering Health Literacy, Health Decision Making, and Health Communication in the Social Networks of Vulnerable New Mothers in Hawai‘i: A Pilot Feasibility Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(7):2356. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17072356

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sentell, Tetine, Joy Agner, Ruth Pitt, James Davis, Mary Guo, and Elizabeth McFarlane. 2020. "Considering Health Literacy, Health Decision Making, and Health Communication in the Social Networks of Vulnerable New Mothers in Hawai‘i: A Pilot Feasibility Study" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 7: 2356. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17072356

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop