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Article

Consumption of a Branched-Chain Amino Acid (BCAA) during Days 2–10 of Pregnancy Causes Abnormal Fetal and Placental Growth: Implications for BCAA Supplementation in Humans

1
Department of Surgery, Division of Neurosurgery, St Francis Hospital, Memphis, TN 38119, USA
2
Department of Biochemistry, Midwestern University, Downers Grove, IL 60515, USA
3
Department of Surgery, Division of Podiatric Medicine and Surgery, Carle Richland Memorial Hospital, Olney, IL 62450, USA
4
Department of Medical Humanities, Rocky Vista University 8401 S. Chambers Road, Parker, CO 80134, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(7), 2445; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17072445
Received: 21 March 2020 / Revised: 29 March 2020 / Accepted: 30 March 2020 / Published: 3 April 2020
A relatively large branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) supplement, consumed for more than 10 days, appears to be especially effective at alleviating muscle damage and soreness during intense human training. However, perturbations in amino acid and protein consumption could have unwanted transgenerational effects on male and female reproduction. This paper hypothesizes that isoleucine consumption by female mice from days 2 to 10 of pregnancy will alter fetal and placental growth later in gestation. Mice that had received 118 mM isoleucine in their drinking water delivered pups on day 19 of pregnancy that were 9% larger than normal, whereas the reverse was true for pups born on day 20. Moreover, the inverse correlation between birth weight and litter size was lost in mice that previously consumed excess isoleucine. Similarly, the normal correlations between fetal and placental weights were lost by day 18 of pregnancy in mice that had consumed excess isoleucine. Mice that consumed excess isoleucine had placentas smaller than, and fetuses larger than normal on day 18 of pregnancy, but the reverse was true on day 15. Other unintended and unexpected effects of BCAA consumption should be studied more thoroughly due to the increasing use of BCAAs to alleviate muscle damage and soreness in athletes. View Full-Text
Keywords: branched-chain amino acids; isoleucine; fetus; placenta; small-for-gestational-age; embryo; muscle; exercise training branched-chain amino acids; isoleucine; fetus; placenta; small-for-gestational-age; embryo; muscle; exercise training
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MDPI and ACS Style

To, C.Y.; Freeman, M.; Van Winkle, L.J. Consumption of a Branched-Chain Amino Acid (BCAA) during Days 2–10 of Pregnancy Causes Abnormal Fetal and Placental Growth: Implications for BCAA Supplementation in Humans. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 2445. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17072445

AMA Style

To CY, Freeman M, Van Winkle LJ. Consumption of a Branched-Chain Amino Acid (BCAA) during Days 2–10 of Pregnancy Causes Abnormal Fetal and Placental Growth: Implications for BCAA Supplementation in Humans. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(7):2445. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17072445

Chicago/Turabian Style

To, Chiu Y., Muriel Freeman, and Lon J. Van Winkle 2020. "Consumption of a Branched-Chain Amino Acid (BCAA) during Days 2–10 of Pregnancy Causes Abnormal Fetal and Placental Growth: Implications for BCAA Supplementation in Humans" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 7: 2445. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17072445

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