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Article

Effects of Acute Exercise on Cutaneous Thermal Sensation

1
Research Institute of Sports & Exercise Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool L3 3AF, UK
2
Department of Physiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, 6525 GA Nijmegen, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(7), 2491; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17072491
Received: 12 March 2020 / Revised: 2 April 2020 / Accepted: 2 April 2020 / Published: 6 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exercise and Human Temperature Regulation)
The aim of this study was to assess the effect of exercise intensity on the thermal sensory function of active and inactive limbs. In a randomised and counterbalanced manner, 13 healthy young male participants (25 ± 6 years, 1.8 ± 0.1 m, 77 ± 6 kg) conducted: (1) 30-min low-intensity (50% heart rate maximum, HRmax; LOW) and (2) 30-min high-intensity (80% HRmax; HIGH) cycling exercises, and (3) 30 min of seated rest (CONTROL). Before, immediately after, and 1 h after, each intervention, thermal sensory functions of the non-dominant dorsal forearm and posterior calf were examined by increasing local skin temperature (1 °C/s) to assess perceptual heat sensitivity and pain thresholds. Relative to pre-exercise, forearm heat sensitivity thresholds were increased immediately and 1 hr after HIGH, but there were no changes after LOW exercise or during CONTROL (main effect of trial; p = 0.017). Relative to pre-exercise, calf heat sensitivity thresholds were not changed after LOW or HIGH exercise or during CONTROL (main effect of trial; p = 0.629). There were no changes in calf (main effect of trial; p = 0.528) or forearm (main effect of trial; p = 0.088) heat pain thresholds after exercise in either LOW or HIGH or CONTROL. These results suggest that cutaneous thermal sensitivity function of an inactive limb is only reduced after higher intensity exercise but is not changed in a previously active limb after exercise. Exercise does not affect heat pain sensitivity in either active or inactive limbs. View Full-Text
Keywords: acute exercise; skin; sensory function; heat acute exercise; skin; sensory function; heat
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MDPI and ACS Style

Thomas, S.D.; Carter, H.H.; Jones, H.; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Low, D.A. Effects of Acute Exercise on Cutaneous Thermal Sensation. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 2491. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17072491

AMA Style

Thomas SD, Carter HH, Jones H, Thijssen DHJ, Low DA. Effects of Acute Exercise on Cutaneous Thermal Sensation. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(7):2491. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17072491

Chicago/Turabian Style

Thomas, Samuel D., Howard H. Carter, Helen Jones, Dick H.J. Thijssen, and David A. Low 2020. "Effects of Acute Exercise on Cutaneous Thermal Sensation" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 7: 2491. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17072491

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