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HIV-Related Stress Experienced by Newly Diagnosed People Living with HIV in China: A 1-Year Longitudinal Study

1
Department of Social Medicine and Health Management, Xiangya School of Public Health, Central South University, Changsha 410078, China
2
Hunan Provincial Center for Disease Prevention and Control, Changsha 410078, China
3
The Jockey Club School of Public Health and Primary Care, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin 810016, Hong Kong, China
4
Changsha Center for Disease Prevention and Control, Changsha 410078, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(8), 2681; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17082681
Received: 18 March 2020 / Revised: 9 April 2020 / Accepted: 10 April 2020 / Published: 14 April 2020
This study explored the HIV-related stressors that people living with HIV (PLWH) commonly experience and express as stressful at the time of diagnosis and 1 year later. The factors associated with stress levels and whether social support would moderate the negative effects of stress on psychological health (depressive and anxiety symptoms) were also investigated. Newly diagnosed PLWH were consecutively recruited in this study. Participants rated their stress with the HIV/AIDS Stress Scale at baseline and 1 year later. Social support, depression, and anxiety were also self-reported at both time points. There were significant decreases in stress levels 1 year after diagnosis. Stressors regarding confidentiality, disclosure, emotional distress, fear of infecting others, and excessive attention to physical functions were the most problematic at baseline and 1-year follow-up. A younger age, married status, not living alone, less income, presence of HIV symptoms, and lack of social support were associated with higher levels of stress. No stress-buffering effect of social support on depressive and anxiety symptoms was found in this study. Interventions to reduce stress among PLWH should take into consideration the following priority stressors: confidentiality, discrimination/stigma, serostatus disclosure, distressing emotions, fear of infecting others, and excessive attention to physical functions. More attention should be paid to PLWH with younger age, not living alone, less income, presence of HIV symptoms, and lack of social support. View Full-Text
Keywords: HIV-related stress; newly diagnosed people living with HIV; social support; depression; anxiety; China HIV-related stress; newly diagnosed people living with HIV; social support; depression; anxiety; China
MDPI and ACS Style

Huang, Y.; Luo, D.; Chen, X.; Zhang, D.; Huang, Z.; Xiao, S. HIV-Related Stress Experienced by Newly Diagnosed People Living with HIV in China: A 1-Year Longitudinal Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 2681. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17082681

AMA Style

Huang Y, Luo D, Chen X, Zhang D, Huang Z, Xiao S. HIV-Related Stress Experienced by Newly Diagnosed People Living with HIV in China: A 1-Year Longitudinal Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(8):2681. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17082681

Chicago/Turabian Style

Huang, Yunxiang; Luo, Dan; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Dexing; Huang, Zhulin; Xiao, Shuiyuan. 2020. "HIV-Related Stress Experienced by Newly Diagnosed People Living with HIV in China: A 1-Year Longitudinal Study" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 8: 2681. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17082681

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