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Article

Naive Forecast for COVID-19 in Utah Based on the South Korea and Italy Models-the Fluctuation between Two Extremes

1
Division of Public Health, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84108, USA
2
Division of Physician Assistant Studies, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84108, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(8), 2750; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17082750
Received: 27 March 2020 / Revised: 9 April 2020 / Accepted: 13 April 2020 / Published: 16 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Disasters and Their Consequences for Public Health)
Differences in jurisdictional public health actions have played a significant role in the relative success of local communities in combating and containing the COVID-19 pandemic. We forecast the possible COVID-19 outbreak in one US state (Utah) by applying empirical data from South Korea and Italy, two countries that implemented disparate public health actions. Forecasts were created by aligning the start of the pandemic in Utah with that in South Korea and Italy, getting a short-run forecast based on actual daily rates of spread, and long-run forecast by employing a log-logistic model with four parameters. Applying the South Korea model, the epidemic peak in Utah is 169 cases/day, with epidemic resolution by the end of May. Applying the Italy model, new cases are forecast to exceed 200/day by mid-April, with the potential for 250 new cases a day at the epidemic peak, with the epidemic continuing through the end of August. We identify a 3-month variation in the likely length of the pandemic, a 1.5-fold difference in the number of daily infections at outbreak peak, and a 3-fold difference in the expected cumulative cases when applying the experience of two developed countries in handling this virus to the Utah context. View Full-Text
Keywords: COVID-19; pandemic; predictive modeling COVID-19; pandemic; predictive modeling
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MDPI and ACS Style

Qeadan, F.; Honda, T.; Gren, L.H.; Dailey-Provost, J.; Benson, L.S.; VanDerslice, J.A.; Porucznik, C.A.; Waters, A.B.; Lacey, S.; Shoaf, K. Naive Forecast for COVID-19 in Utah Based on the South Korea and Italy Models-the Fluctuation between Two Extremes. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 2750. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17082750

AMA Style

Qeadan F, Honda T, Gren LH, Dailey-Provost J, Benson LS, VanDerslice JA, Porucznik CA, Waters AB, Lacey S, Shoaf K. Naive Forecast for COVID-19 in Utah Based on the South Korea and Italy Models-the Fluctuation between Two Extremes. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(8):2750. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17082750

Chicago/Turabian Style

Qeadan, Fares, Trenton Honda, Lisa H. Gren, Jennifer Dailey-Provost, L. S. Benson, James A. VanDerslice, Christina A. Porucznik, A. B. Waters, Steven Lacey, and Kimberley Shoaf. 2020. "Naive Forecast for COVID-19 in Utah Based on the South Korea and Italy Models-the Fluctuation between Two Extremes" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 8: 2750. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17082750

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