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Article

Near-Road Traffic-Related Air Pollution: Resuspended PM2.5 from Highways and Arterials

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Zachry Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, College Station, TX 77843-3127, USA
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Environment and Air Quality Division, Texas A&M Transportation Institute, College Station, TX 77843-3135, USA
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Center for Advancing Research in Transportation Emissions, Energy, and Health (CARTEEH), Texas A&M Transportation Institute, College Station, TX 77843-3135, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(8), 2851; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17082851
Received: 2 March 2020 / Revised: 15 April 2020 / Accepted: 17 April 2020 / Published: 21 April 2020
Recent studies suggest that the transportation sector is a major contributor to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in urban areas. A growing body of literature indicates PM2.5 exposure can lead to adverse health effects, and that PM2.5 concentrations are often elevated close to roadways. The transportation sector produces PM2.5 emissions from combustion, brake wear, tire wear, and resuspended dust. Traffic-related resuspended dust is particulate matter, previously deposited on the surface of roadways that becomes resuspended into the air by the movement of traffic. The objective of this study was to use regulatory guidelines to model the contribution of resuspended dust to near-road traffic-related PM2.5 concentrations. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidelines for quantitative hotspot analysis were used to predict traffic-related PM2.5 concentrations for a small network in Dallas, Texas. Results show that the inclusion of resuspended dust in the emission and dispersion modeling chain increases prediction of near-road PM2.5 concentrations by up to 74%. The results also suggest elevated PM2.5 concentrations near arterial roads. Our results are discussed in the context of human exposure to traffic-related air pollution. View Full-Text
Keywords: resuspended dust; road dust; PM2.5; near-road; traffic; air pollution; MOtor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES); American Meteorological Society/Environmental Protection Agency Regulatory Model (AERMOD) resuspended dust; road dust; PM2.5; near-road; traffic; air pollution; MOtor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES); American Meteorological Society/Environmental Protection Agency Regulatory Model (AERMOD)
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MDPI and ACS Style

Askariyeh, M.H.; Venugopal, M.; Khreis, H.; Birt, A.; Zietsman, J. Near-Road Traffic-Related Air Pollution: Resuspended PM2.5 from Highways and Arterials. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 2851. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17082851

AMA Style

Askariyeh MH, Venugopal M, Khreis H, Birt A, Zietsman J. Near-Road Traffic-Related Air Pollution: Resuspended PM2.5 from Highways and Arterials. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(8):2851. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17082851

Chicago/Turabian Style

Askariyeh, Mohammad H., Madhusudhan Venugopal, Haneen Khreis, Andrew Birt, and Josias Zietsman. 2020. "Near-Road Traffic-Related Air Pollution: Resuspended PM2.5 from Highways and Arterials" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 8: 2851. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17082851

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