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Article

Examining the Effects of Overtime Work on Subjective Social Status and Social Inclusion in the Chinese Context

by 1,2, 3,* and 1,2,*
1
College of Business, Yantai Nanshan University, Yantai 265713, China
2
School of Economics and Management, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004, China
3
School of Tourism Sciences, Beijing International Studies University, Beijing 100024, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(9), 3265; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17093265
Received: 8 April 2020 / Revised: 30 April 2020 / Accepted: 4 May 2020 / Published: 7 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health Psychology)
Although researchers have argued that long work hours have been shown to threaten individual health, lead to work-family conflict, and reduce job performance, the effect of overtime work on social-related outcomes has received little attention. Based on the framework of relative deprivation, we attempt to address this important issue by exploring whether, why, and when individuals’ overtime work influences their social attitudes. By using the data of 400 Chinese employees from the China Labor-Force Dynamics Survey (CLD), we found that overtime work was associated with a low level of subjective social status and social inclusion. In addition, we found that the time type of overtime work (work overtime on weekdays or on weekends and holidays) has a moderating effect on the relationship between overtime work and social inclusion. That is, employees who work overtime on weekdays are unlikely to have a sense of social inclusion. Furthermore, the negative relationship between overtime work and subjective social status was stronger at a low level of fairness rather than a high level of fairness. In contrast, the negative relationship between overtime work and social inclusion was stronger at a high level of fairness rather than a low level of fairness. These findings highlight the critical role of overtime work in social life and also provide novel insights into social intervention aimed at the happiness and harmony of a society. View Full-Text
Keywords: overtime work; subjective social status; social inclusion; fairness; overtime type overtime work; subjective social status; social inclusion; fairness; overtime type
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MDPI and ACS Style

Chen, Y.; Li, P.; Yang, C. Examining the Effects of Overtime Work on Subjective Social Status and Social Inclusion in the Chinese Context. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 3265. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17093265

AMA Style

Chen Y, Li P, Yang C. Examining the Effects of Overtime Work on Subjective Social Status and Social Inclusion in the Chinese Context. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(9):3265. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17093265

Chicago/Turabian Style

Chen, Yashuo, Pengbo Li, and Chunjiang Yang. 2020. "Examining the Effects of Overtime Work on Subjective Social Status and Social Inclusion in the Chinese Context" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 9: 3265. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17093265

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