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Gardening in Ashes: The Possibilities and Limitations of Gardening to Support Indigenous Health and Well-Being in the Context of Wildfires and Colonialism

Interdisciplinary Studies, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6B2T5, Canada
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(9), 3273; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17093273
Received: 31 January 2020 / Revised: 31 March 2020 / Accepted: 17 April 2020 / Published: 8 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Health and Well-Being of Indigenous People)
In this paper, we will discuss gardening as a relationship with nature and an ongoing process to support Indigenous health and well-being in the context of the climate crisis and increasingly widespread forest fires. We will explore the concept of gardening as both a Euro-Western agriculture practice and as a longstanding Indigenous practice—wherein naturally occurring gardens are tended in relationship and related to a wider engagement with the natural world — and the influences of colonialism and climate change on both. Drawing on our experiences as an Indigenous Knowledge Keeper (Dancing Water) and a non-Indigenous community-based researcher (Kelsey), our dialogue will outline ways to support health and well-being through land-based activities that connect with Indigenous traditions in ways that draw on relationships to confront colonialism and the influences of climate change. This dialogue is founded on our experiences in the central interior of British Columbia, Canada, one of the areas hit hardest by the 2017 wildfires. We will explore the possibilities and limitations of gardening and the wider concept of reciprocity and relationship as a means to support food security, food sovereignty, and health for Indigenous Peoples. View Full-Text
Keywords: Indigenous health; reciprocity; gardening; climate change; climate crisis; colonialism; Indigenous sovereignty; wildfires; natural gardens; food security; blanket exercise Indigenous health; reciprocity; gardening; climate change; climate crisis; colonialism; Indigenous sovereignty; wildfires; natural gardens; food security; blanket exercise
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MDPI and ACS Style

Timler, K.; Sandy, D.W. Gardening in Ashes: The Possibilities and Limitations of Gardening to Support Indigenous Health and Well-Being in the Context of Wildfires and Colonialism. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 3273. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17093273

AMA Style

Timler K, Sandy DW. Gardening in Ashes: The Possibilities and Limitations of Gardening to Support Indigenous Health and Well-Being in the Context of Wildfires and Colonialism. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(9):3273. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17093273

Chicago/Turabian Style

Timler, Kelsey, and Dancing W. Sandy 2020. "Gardening in Ashes: The Possibilities and Limitations of Gardening to Support Indigenous Health and Well-Being in the Context of Wildfires and Colonialism" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 9: 3273. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17093273

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