Next Article in Journal
Comparison of Grip Strength in Recreational Climbers and Non-Climbing Athletes—A Cross-Sectional Study
Next Article in Special Issue
COVID-19-Related Fear and Anxiety: Spiritual-Religious Coping in Healthcare Workers in Portugal
Previous Article in Journal / Special Issue
Emotional Eating in Relation to Worries and Psychological Distress Amid the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Population-Based Survey on Adults in Norway
Article

Coping Mechanisms: Exploring Strategies Utilized by Japanese Healthcare Workers to Reduce Stress and Improve Mental Health during the COVID-19 Pandemic

1
Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kitasato University, 1-15-1, Kitasato, Minami-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-0373, Japan
2
Department of Rehabilitation Therapist, Saiseikai Higashikanagawa Rehabilitation Hospital, 1-13-10, Nishikanagawa, Kanagawa-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 221-0822, Japan
3
Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Allied Health Sciences, Kitasato University, 1-15-1, Kitasato, Minami-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-0373, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(1), 131; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18010131
Received: 18 November 2020 / Revised: 23 December 2020 / Accepted: 23 December 2020 / Published: 27 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health in the Time of COVID-19)
The COVID-19 pandemic is a major problem affecting the mental health of millions of people, including healthcare workers. In this study, we analyzed risk factors and coping mechanisms that could reduce the risk of poor mental health among healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic in Japan. A cross-sectional survey was conducted for 7 days from 30 April 2020 using a web-based questionnaire. The survey assessed various outcome measures, including the General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12), health status, satisfaction with daily life activities, work, leisure, and new activities, and anxiety over COVID-19. Data from 661 participants were analyzed, and 440 participants (66.6%) showed poor mental health (GHQ-12 ≥ 4). Also, our result showed that female gender, lower levels of communication with friends, and high anxiety were associated with poorer mental health. In contrast, good health status, high work satisfaction, and high satisfaction from new activities were associated with buffering mental health problem. Most participants chose an escape-avoidance coping strategy, and participants with worse mental health were more likely to adopt seeking social support as a coping strategy. These results may support healthcare workers to cope with mental health problems associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. View Full-Text
Keywords: COVID-19; coping strategy; healthcare worker; mental health; stress coping COVID-19; coping strategy; healthcare worker; mental health; stress coping
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Tahara, M.; Mashizume, Y.; Takahashi, K. Coping Mechanisms: Exploring Strategies Utilized by Japanese Healthcare Workers to Reduce Stress and Improve Mental Health during the COVID-19 Pandemic. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 131. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18010131

AMA Style

Tahara M, Mashizume Y, Takahashi K. Coping Mechanisms: Exploring Strategies Utilized by Japanese Healthcare Workers to Reduce Stress and Improve Mental Health during the COVID-19 Pandemic. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(1):131. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18010131

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tahara, Masatoshi, Yuki Mashizume, and Kayoko Takahashi. 2021. "Coping Mechanisms: Exploring Strategies Utilized by Japanese Healthcare Workers to Reduce Stress and Improve Mental Health during the COVID-19 Pandemic" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 1: 131. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18010131

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop