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Article

Direct and Inverse Correlates of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder among School-Age Autistic Boys

Brain-Behaviour Research Group, School of Science and Technology, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2350, Australia
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(10), 5285; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18105285
Received: 25 April 2021 / Revised: 10 May 2021 / Accepted: 13 May 2021 / Published: 16 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health and Well-Being in Vulnerable Communities)
Young people with autism are often bullied at school, a potential direct correlate of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). This may be compounded by their difficulties in social interaction. Alternately, some of these young people may develop ‘coping strategies’ against bullying that may have an inverse association with PTSD. As a vulnerable population for PTSD, a sample of 71 young males with autism were surveyed for their self-reported experiences of being bullied at school, their coping strategies for dealing with this bullying, and their own evaluations of the severity of two of the key diagnostic criteria for PTSD. Their mothers also provided a rating of the severity of the three major diagnostic criteria for autism for these boys. Over 80% of this sample had been bullied, and there was a significant direct correlation between this and PTSD score, and between their mother-rated severity of the boys’ social interaction difficulties, but also a significant inverse correlation between their coping strategies and PTSD score. There were differences in these relationships according to whether the boys attended elementary or secondary school. These findings hold implications for the identification, assessment and support of autistic youth at risk of PTSD. View Full-Text
Keywords: autism; trauma; stress; bullying; school autism; trauma; stress; bullying; school
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bitsika, V.; Sharpley, C.F. Direct and Inverse Correlates of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder among School-Age Autistic Boys. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 5285. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18105285

AMA Style

Bitsika V, Sharpley CF. Direct and Inverse Correlates of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder among School-Age Autistic Boys. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(10):5285. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18105285

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bitsika, Vicki, and Christopher F. Sharpley 2021. "Direct and Inverse Correlates of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder among School-Age Autistic Boys" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 10: 5285. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18105285

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