Next Article in Journal
Developmental Hip Dysplasia: An Epidemiological Nationwide Study in Italy from 2001 to 2016
Previous Article in Journal
Comparative Evaluation of Occlusion before and after Soft Tissue Mobilization in Patients with Temporomandibular Disorder—Myofascial Pain with Referral
Article

Prevalence of Everyday Discrimination and Relation with Wellbeing among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Adults in Australia

1
National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2600, Australia
2
Department of Community Health Sciences, Fielding School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90024, USA
3
Centre for Social Research and Methods, College of Arts and Social Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2600, Australia
4
Population Health, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Royal Children’s Hospital, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia
5
Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA
6
Poche Indigenous Health Network New South Wales, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW 2006, Australia
7
University of Canberra, Bruce, ACT 2617, Australia
8
Ninti One, Hackney, SA 5071, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Mayi Kuwayu Study Team are listed in acknowledgments.
Academic Editors: Shawnita Sealy-Jefferson, Kristen Brown, Zinzi Bailey and Sharrelle Barber
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(12), 6577; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18126577
Received: 20 May 2021 / Revised: 8 June 2021 / Accepted: 15 June 2021 / Published: 18 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social Epidemiology to Eliminate Disparities)
Discrimination is a fundamental determinant of health and health inequities. However, despite the high prevalence of discrimination exposure, there is limited evidence specific to Indigenous populations on the link between discrimination and health. This study employs a validated measure to quantify experiences of everyday discrimination in a national sample of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Australia’s Indigenous peoples) adults surveyed from 2018 to 2020 (≥16 years, n = 8108). It quantifies Prevalence Ratios (PRs) and 95% Confidence Intervals (CIs) for wellbeing outcomes by level of discrimination exposure, and tests if associations vary by attribution of discrimination to Indigeneity. Of the participants, 41.5% reported no discrimination, 47.5% low, and 11.0% moderate-high. Discrimination was more commonly reported by younger versus older participants, females versus males, and those living in remote versus urban or regional areas. Discrimination was significantly associated in a dose-response manner, with measures of social and emotional wellbeing, culture and identity, health behaviour, and health outcomes. The strength of the association varied across outcomes, from a 10–20% increased prevalence for some outcomes (e.g., disconnection from culture (PR = 1.08; 95% CI: 1.03, 1.14), and high blood pressure (1.20; 1.09, 1.32)), to a five-fold prevalence of alcohol dependence (4.96; 3.64, 6.76), for those with moderate-high versus no discrimination exposure. The association was of consistent strength and direction whether attributed to Indigeneity or not—with three exceptions. Discrimination is associated with a broad range of poor wellbeing outcomes in this large-scale, national, diverse cohort of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults. These findings support the vast potential to improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ wellbeing, and to reduce Indigenous-non-Indigenous inequities, by reducing exposure to discrimination. View Full-Text
Keywords: racism; indigenous peoples; health inequalities; social epidemiology; social determinants of health; Australia racism; indigenous peoples; health inequalities; social epidemiology; social determinants of health; Australia
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Thurber, K.A.; Colonna, E.; Jones, R.; Gee, G.C.; Priest, N.; Cohen, R.; Williams, D.R.; Thandrayen, J.; Calma, T.; Lovett, R.; on behalf of the Mayi Kuwayu Study Team. Prevalence of Everyday Discrimination and Relation with Wellbeing among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Adults in Australia. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 6577. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18126577

AMA Style

Thurber KA, Colonna E, Jones R, Gee GC, Priest N, Cohen R, Williams DR, Thandrayen J, Calma T, Lovett R, on behalf of the Mayi Kuwayu Study Team. Prevalence of Everyday Discrimination and Relation with Wellbeing among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Adults in Australia. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(12):6577. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18126577

Chicago/Turabian Style

Thurber, Katherine A., Emily Colonna, Roxanne Jones, Gilbert C. Gee, Naomi Priest, Rubijayne Cohen, David R. Williams, Joanne Thandrayen, Tom Calma, Raymond Lovett, and on behalf of the Mayi Kuwayu Study Team. 2021. "Prevalence of Everyday Discrimination and Relation with Wellbeing among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Adults in Australia" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 12: 6577. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18126577

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop