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Review

Nurse-Coordinated Blood Pressure Telemonitoring for Urban Hypertensive Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

by 1,2,*, 3, 1 and 1
1
Moon Soul Graduate School of Future Strategy, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 34141, Korea
2
Keyu Internal Medicine Clinic, Daejeon 35250, Korea
3
Public Health and Welfare Bureau, Daejeon City Hall, Daejeon 35242, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Irene Torres-Sánchez and Marie Carmen Valenza
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(13), 6892; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18136892
Received: 29 May 2021 / Revised: 22 June 2021 / Accepted: 24 June 2021 / Published: 27 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue eHealth in Chronic Diseases)
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has put hypertensive patients in densely populated cities at increased risk. Nurse-coordinated home blood pressure telemonitoring (NC-HBPT) may help address this. We screened studies published in English on three databases, from their inception to 30 November 2020. The effects of NC-HBPT were compared with in-person treatment. Outcomes included changes in blood pressure (BP) following the intervention and rate of BP target achievements before and during COVID-19. Of the 1916 articles identified, 27 comparisons were included in this review. In the intervention group, reductions of 5.731 mmHg (95% confidence interval: 4.120–7.341; p < 0.001) in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and 2.342 mmHg (1.482–3.202; p < 0.001) in diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were identified. The rate of target BP achievement was significant in the intervention group (risk ratio, RR = 1.261, 1.154–1.378; p < 0.001). The effects of intervention over time showed an SBP reduction of 3.000 mmHg (−5.999–11.999) before 2000 and 8.755 mmHg (5.177–12.334) in 2020. DBP reduced by 2.000 mmHg (−2.724–6.724) before 2000 and by 3.529 mmHg (1.221–5.838) in 2020. Analysis of the target BP ratio before 2010 (RR = 1.101, 1.013–1.198) and in 2020 (RR = 1.906, 1.462–2.487) suggested improved BP control during the pandemic. NC-HBPT more significantly improves office blood pressure than UC among urban hypertensive patients. View Full-Text
Keywords: blood pressure; hypertension; COVID-19; nurse; coordination; telemonitoring; urban blood pressure; hypertension; COVID-19; nurse; coordination; telemonitoring; urban
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MDPI and ACS Style

Choi, W.-S.; Kim, N.-S.; Kim, A.-Y.; Woo, H.-S. Nurse-Coordinated Blood Pressure Telemonitoring for Urban Hypertensive Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 6892. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18136892

AMA Style

Choi W-S, Kim N-S, Kim A-Y, Woo H-S. Nurse-Coordinated Blood Pressure Telemonitoring for Urban Hypertensive Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(13):6892. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18136892

Chicago/Turabian Style

Choi, Woo-Seok, Nam-Suk Kim, Ah-Young Kim, and Hyung-Soo Woo. 2021. "Nurse-Coordinated Blood Pressure Telemonitoring for Urban Hypertensive Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 13: 6892. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18136892

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