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Article

Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Devices and Other Technologies on Deaf and Hard of Hearing People

1
Faculty Padre Ossó (Asociated Center of the University of Oviedo), Degree in Occupational Therapy, University of Oviedo, 33008 Oviedo, Spain
2
Institute for Community Inclusion (INICO), University of Salamanca, 37005 Salamanca, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(14), 7259; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18147259
Received: 9 May 2021 / Revised: 4 July 2021 / Accepted: 6 July 2021 / Published: 7 July 2021
Deaf and hard of hearing people use a variety of assistive devices and technologies as a strategy to mitigate, counter or compensate for life difficulties resulting from hearing loss. Although outcome measures are commonly used with hearing aids, few studies have explored the perceived psychosocial impact of other assistive devices and technologies or the factors leading to their abandonment or lack of use. Therefore, the main aim of this study was to assess the psychosocial impact of different assistive devices on deaf and hard of hearing people using the Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Devices Scale. The sample was made up of 291 individuals, 176 women and 115 men, with an average age of 56.12 years (standard deviation (SD) = 25.11), who were all users of different assistive devices. Overall, the results of the study showed that the use of assistive devices had a positive psychosocial impact, although this impact varied slightly depending on the specific type of device. Moreover, a relationship was identified between the psychosocial impact and the probability of future abandonment of a hearing aid or a cochlear implant. The results point to the importance of considering the psychosocial impact derived from the use of a device as a relevant variable in the adoption process of assistive technologies for deaf and hard of hearing people. View Full-Text
Keywords: assistive technology; hearing aids; outcomes assistive technology; hearing aids; outcomes
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MDPI and ACS Style

Jiménez-Arberas, E.; Díez, E. Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Devices and Other Technologies on Deaf and Hard of Hearing People. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 7259. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18147259

AMA Style

Jiménez-Arberas E, Díez E. Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Devices and Other Technologies on Deaf and Hard of Hearing People. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(14):7259. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18147259

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jiménez-Arberas, Estíbaliz, and Emiliano Díez. 2021. "Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Devices and Other Technologies on Deaf and Hard of Hearing People" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 14: 7259. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18147259

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