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Article

Relations between Stress and Depressive Symptoms in Psychiatric Nurses: The Mediating Effects of Sleep Quality and Occupational Burnout

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School of Nursing, College of Nursing, Kaohsiung Medical University, No.100, Shih-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan
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Department of Medical Research, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan
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Nursing Department, Chi-Mei Medical Center, Tainan 71004, Taiwan
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College of Humanities and Social Science, Southern Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Tainan 71005, Taiwan
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Department of Psychiatry, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Jordi Fernández-Castro and Fermín Martínez-Zaragoza
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(14), 7327; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18147327
Received: 3 June 2021 / Revised: 30 June 2021 / Accepted: 6 July 2021 / Published: 8 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Stress Exposure on Mental Health and Well-Being)
This study examines the parallel multiple mediators of quality of sleep and occupational burnout between perceived stress and depressive symptoms in psychiatric nurses. Nurses are more likely to experience depression, anxiety, decreased job satisfaction, and reduced organizational loyalty as a result of the stressful work environment and heavy workload. A total of 248 psychiatric ward (PW) nurses participated in this cross-sectional survey study. Structural equation modelling was used for data analysis. In the model of parallel multiple mediators for depressive symptoms, quality of sleep and occupational burnout played mediating roles, and these two mediators strengthened the effect of stress on depressive symptoms, with the final model showing a good fit. Stress, occupational burnout, and quality of sleep explained 46.0% of the variance in psychiatric nurses’ depressive symptoms. Stress had no significantly direct effect on psychiatric nurses’ depressive symptoms, but it had a completed mediation effect on their depressive symptoms through occupational burnout and quality of sleep. This study showed that reduction of occupational burnout and improvement of quality of sleep play important roles against depressive symptoms among PW nurses. Healthcare managers should provide PW nurses with a better environment for improving quality of sleep and reducing occupational burnout. View Full-Text
Keywords: stress; occupational burnout; quality of sleep; depressive symptoms; psychiatric nurses stress; occupational burnout; quality of sleep; depressive symptoms; psychiatric nurses
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hsieh, H.-F.; Liu, Y.; Hsu, H.-T.; Ma, S.-C.; Wang, H.-H.; Ko, C.-H. Relations between Stress and Depressive Symptoms in Psychiatric Nurses: The Mediating Effects of Sleep Quality and Occupational Burnout. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 7327. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18147327

AMA Style

Hsieh H-F, Liu Y, Hsu H-T, Ma S-C, Wang H-H, Ko C-H. Relations between Stress and Depressive Symptoms in Psychiatric Nurses: The Mediating Effects of Sleep Quality and Occupational Burnout. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(14):7327. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18147327

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hsieh, Hsiu-Fen, Yi Liu, Hsin-Tien Hsu, Shu-Ching Ma, Hsiu-Hung Wang, and Chih-Hung Ko. 2021. "Relations between Stress and Depressive Symptoms in Psychiatric Nurses: The Mediating Effects of Sleep Quality and Occupational Burnout" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 14: 7327. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18147327

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