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Characteristics and Trends of the Hospital Standardized Readmission Ratios for Pneumonia: A Retrospective Observational Study Using Japanese Administrative Claims Data from 2010 to 2018

Department of Social Medicine, Toho University School of Medicine, 5-21-16 Omori-Nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143-8540, Japan
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Academic Editors: Nicola Bartolomeo, Margherita Fanelli and Paolo Trerotoli
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(14), 7624; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18147624
Received: 1 July 2021 / Revised: 14 July 2021 / Accepted: 16 July 2021 / Published: 17 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Data and Methods for Monitoring and Decisions in Public Health)
Previous studies indicated that optimal care for pneumonia during hospitalization might reduce the risk of in-hospital mortality and subsequent readmission. This study was a retrospective observational study using Japanese administrative claims data from April 2010 to March 2019. We analyzed data from 167,120 inpatients with pneumonia ≥15 years old in the benchmarking project managed by All Japan Hospital Association. Hospital-level risk-adjusted ratios of 30-day readmission for pneumonia were calculated using multivariable logistic regression analyses. The Spearman’s correlation coefficient was used to assess the correlation in each consecutive period. In the analysis using complete 9-year data including 54,756 inpatients, the hospital standardized readmission ratios (HSRRs) showed wide variation among hospitals and improvement trend (r = −0.18, p = 0.03). In the analyses of trends in each consecutive period, the HSRRS were positively correlated between ‘2010–2012’ and ‘2013–2015’ (r = 0.255, p = 0.010), and ‘2013–2015’ and ‘2016–2018’ (r = 0.603, p < 0.001). This study denoted the HSRRs for pneumonia could be calculated using Japanese administrative claims data. The HSRRs significantly varied among hospitals with comparable case-mix, and could relatively evaluate the quality of preventing readmission including long-term trends. The HSRRs can be used as yet another measure to help improve quality of care over time if other indicators are examined in parallel. View Full-Text
Keywords: administrative claims data; Japan; pneumonia; patient readmission; quality indicator administrative claims data; Japan; pneumonia; patient readmission; quality indicator
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MDPI and ACS Style

Onishi, R.; Hatakeyama, Y.; Matsumoto, K.; Seto, K.; Hirata, K.; Hasegawa, T. Characteristics and Trends of the Hospital Standardized Readmission Ratios for Pneumonia: A Retrospective Observational Study Using Japanese Administrative Claims Data from 2010 to 2018. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 7624. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18147624

AMA Style

Onishi R, Hatakeyama Y, Matsumoto K, Seto K, Hirata K, Hasegawa T. Characteristics and Trends of the Hospital Standardized Readmission Ratios for Pneumonia: A Retrospective Observational Study Using Japanese Administrative Claims Data from 2010 to 2018. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(14):7624. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18147624

Chicago/Turabian Style

Onishi, Ryo, Yosuke Hatakeyama, Kunichika Matsumoto, Kanako Seto, Koki Hirata, and Tomonori Hasegawa. 2021. "Characteristics and Trends of the Hospital Standardized Readmission Ratios for Pneumonia: A Retrospective Observational Study Using Japanese Administrative Claims Data from 2010 to 2018" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 14: 7624. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18147624

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