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Article

Wind Environment Simulation Accuracy in Traditional Villages with Complex Layouts Based on CFD

1
Faculty of Environmental Engineering, The University of Kitakyushu, Kitakyushu 808-0135, Japan
2
School of Communication Engineering, Xidian University, Xi’an 710071, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Shu-Yuan Pan, Li-Chi Chiang and Yu-Pin Lin
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(16), 8644; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18168644
Received: 29 June 2021 / Revised: 11 August 2021 / Accepted: 12 August 2021 / Published: 16 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Engineering for Sustainable Environment)
Using wind speed, wind direction, and turbulence intensity values as evaluation indicators, the ventilation performance of villages with complex building layouts was studied. We used the SKE, RNG, and RKE solvers in CFD-3D steady-state Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) to simulate the wind environment of a village. The findings show that for the simulation of rural wind environments with complex building layouts, steady-state simulation solvers need to be evaluated in detail to verify their accuracy. In this study, a village with a complex architectural layout in Southern Shaanxi, China, was taken as the research object, and three steady-state simulation solvers were used to evaluate the ventilation performance of the village. The simulated data were compared with the measured data to find the most suitable solver for this kind of village wind environment simulation. The results show that for the simulation of the village wind environment with a complex building layout, the RNG simulation results have the lowest reliability among the three steady-state solvers. The reliability of wind speed distribution and turbulence intensity distribution are 0.7881 and 0.2473, respectively. However, the wind speed and turbulence intensity values obtained by the SKE solver are the closest to the measured values, which are 0.8625 and 0.9088, respectively. Therefore, for villages with complex building layouts, the SKE solver should be the first choice for simulating wind environment distribution. When using the RNG solver, the overall turbulence intensity value obtained is higher than the measured value. The average deviation between the simulated data and SKE and RKE at a height of 1.7 m is 42.61%. The main reason for this is that RNG overestimates the vortices and underestimates the airflow rate in the building intervals. View Full-Text
Keywords: CFD; building environment; steady-state simulation; rural ventilation CFD; building environment; steady-state simulation; rural ventilation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Yao, X.; Han, S.; Dewancker, B. Wind Environment Simulation Accuracy in Traditional Villages with Complex Layouts Based on CFD. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 8644. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18168644

AMA Style

Yao X, Han S, Dewancker B. Wind Environment Simulation Accuracy in Traditional Villages with Complex Layouts Based on CFD. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(16):8644. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18168644

Chicago/Turabian Style

Yao, Xingbo, Shuo Han, and Bart Dewancker. 2021. "Wind Environment Simulation Accuracy in Traditional Villages with Complex Layouts Based on CFD" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 16: 8644. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18168644

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