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Article

Minimal Clinically Important Difference and Patient Acceptable Symptom State for the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index in Patients Who Underwent Rotator Cuff Tear Repair

1
Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Campus Bio-Medico University, Via Alvaro del Portillo, 200, Trigoria, 00128 Rome, Italy
2
Research Unit Nursing Science, Campus Bio-Medico di Roma University, 00128 Rome, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Mirca Marini
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(16), 8666; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18168666
Received: 10 June 2021 / Revised: 11 August 2021 / Accepted: 14 August 2021 / Published: 17 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Burden of Orthopedic Surgery)
The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) is a valid patient-reported outcome measure developed to assess sleep quality and disturbances in clinical populations. This study aimed to calculate the minimum clinically important difference (MCID) and the patient acceptable symptom state (PASS) for the PSQI in patients who underwent rotator cuff repair (RCR). Preoperative and six-month postoperative follow-up questionnaires were completed by 50 patients (25 males and 25 females, mean age 58.7 ± 11.1 years). The MCID of the PSQI was calculated using distribution-based and anchor methods. To calculate the PSQI’s PASS, the 75th percentile approach and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were used. The MCID from preoperative to 6 months postoperative follow-up is 4.4. Patients who improved their PSQI score of 4.4 from baseline to 6 months follow-up had a clinically significant increase in their health status. The PASS is 5.5 for PSQI; therefore, a value of PSQI at least 5.5 at six months follow-up indicates that the symptom state can be considered acceptable by most patients. View Full-Text
Keywords: rotator cuff repair; Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index; PSQI; minimal clinically important difference; MCID; patient acceptable symptom state; PASS rotator cuff repair; Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index; PSQI; minimal clinically important difference; MCID; patient acceptable symptom state; PASS
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MDPI and ACS Style

Longo, U.G.; Berton, A.; De Salvatore, S.; Piergentili, I.; Casciani, E.; Faldetta, A.; De Marinis, M.G.; Denaro, V. Minimal Clinically Important Difference and Patient Acceptable Symptom State for the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index in Patients Who Underwent Rotator Cuff Tear Repair. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 8666. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18168666

AMA Style

Longo UG, Berton A, De Salvatore S, Piergentili I, Casciani E, Faldetta A, De Marinis MG, Denaro V. Minimal Clinically Important Difference and Patient Acceptable Symptom State for the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index in Patients Who Underwent Rotator Cuff Tear Repair. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(16):8666. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18168666

Chicago/Turabian Style

Longo, Umile G., Alessandra Berton, Sergio De Salvatore, Ilaria Piergentili, Erica Casciani, Aurora Faldetta, Maria G. De Marinis, and Vincenzo Denaro. 2021. "Minimal Clinically Important Difference and Patient Acceptable Symptom State for the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index in Patients Who Underwent Rotator Cuff Tear Repair" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 16: 8666. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18168666

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