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Article

COVID-19: A Cross-Sectional Study of Healthcare Students’ Perceptions of Life during the Pandemic in the United States and Brazil

1
School of Public Health, SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University, Brooklyn, NY 11203, USA
2
Keizo Asami Immunopathology Laboratory, Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife 50670-901, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Alberto Villani, Elena Bozzola, Paolo Palma and Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(17), 9217; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18179217
Received: 17 July 2021 / Revised: 19 August 2021 / Accepted: 27 August 2021 / Published: 1 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Children and Adolescents: Preventable Infectious Diseases)
Societal influences, such as beliefs and behaviors, and their increasing complexity add to the challenges of interactivity promoted by globalization. This study was developed during a virtual global educational exchange experience and designed for research and educational purposes to assess personal social and cultural risk factors for students’ COVID-19 personal prevention behavior and perceptions about life during the pandemic, and to inform future educational efforts in intercultural learning for healthcare students. We designed and implemented a cross-sectional anonymous online survey intended to assess social and cultural risk factors for COVID-19 personal prevention behavior and students’ perceptions about life during the pandemic in public health and healthcare students in two public universities (United States n = 53; Brazil n = 55). Statistically significant differences existed between the United States and Brazil students in degree type, employment, risk behavior, personal prevention procedures, sanitization perceptions, and views of governmental policies. Cultural and social differences, risk messaging, and lifestyle factors may contribute to disparities in perceptions and behaviors of students around the novel infectious disease, with implications for future global infectious disease control. View Full-Text
Keywords: COVID-19 risk perceptions; healthcare students’ perceptions; health risk factors; infection prevention; health promotion; international collaboration; intercultural learning COVID-19 risk perceptions; healthcare students’ perceptions; health risk factors; infection prevention; health promotion; international collaboration; intercultural learning
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MDPI and ACS Style

Geer, L.A.; Radigan, R.; Bruneli, G.d.L.; Leite, L.S.; Belian, R.B. COVID-19: A Cross-Sectional Study of Healthcare Students’ Perceptions of Life during the Pandemic in the United States and Brazil. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 9217. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18179217

AMA Style

Geer LA, Radigan R, Bruneli GdL, Leite LS, Belian RB. COVID-19: A Cross-Sectional Study of Healthcare Students’ Perceptions of Life during the Pandemic in the United States and Brazil. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(17):9217. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18179217

Chicago/Turabian Style

Geer, Laura A., Rachel Radigan, Guilherme d.L. Bruneli, Lucas S. Leite, and Rosalie B. Belian. 2021. "COVID-19: A Cross-Sectional Study of Healthcare Students’ Perceptions of Life during the Pandemic in the United States and Brazil" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 17: 9217. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18179217

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