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Article

Effects of Hurricane Michael on Access to Care for Pregnant Women and Associated Pregnancy Outcomes

1
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA
2
Department of Behavioral Sciences and Social Medicine, College of Medicine, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA
3
Department of Geography, College of Social Sciences and Public Policy, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA
4
Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(2), 390; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18020390
Received: 8 December 2020 / Revised: 29 December 2020 / Accepted: 31 December 2020 / Published: 6 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Disasters and Their Consequences for Public Health)
Background: Disasters are associated with worse perinatal outcomes, perhaps due to inadequate prenatal care (PNC). Methods: Using 2017–2019 Florida vital statistics, we compared PNC use before and after Hurricane Michael. We categorized counties as most affected (Area A) or less affected (Area B and C). We examined whether Michael’s effects on perinatal outcomes varied by maternity care availability and used the Baron and Kenny method to assess whether delayed PNC initiation mediated perinatal outcomes. Log-binomial regression and semi-parametric linear regression were used, controlling for maternal and ZIP code tabulation area characteristics. Results: Compared to the one-year period pre-Michael, the week of the first PNC was later in all areas in the one-year period post-Michael, with the largest change in Area A (adjusted difference 0.112, 95% CI: 0.055–0.169), where women were less likely to receive PNC overall (aRR = 0.994, 95% CI = 0.990–0.998) and more likely to have inadequate PNC (aRR = 1.193, 95% CI = 1.127–1.264). Michael’s effects on perinatal outcomes did not vary significantly by maternity care availability within Area A. Delayed PNC initiation appeared to mediate an increased risk in small for gestational age (SGA) births after Michael. Conclusion: Women in Area A initiated PNC later and had a higher likelihood of inadequate PNC. Delayed PNC initiation may partially explain increased risk of SGA. View Full-Text
Keywords: disaster; prenatal care; perinatal outcomes disaster; prenatal care; perinatal outcomes
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MDPI and ACS Style

Pan, K.; Beitsch, L.; Gonsoroski, E.; Sherchan, S.P.; Uejio, C.K.; Lichtveld, M.Y.; Harville, E.W. Effects of Hurricane Michael on Access to Care for Pregnant Women and Associated Pregnancy Outcomes. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 390. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18020390

AMA Style

Pan K, Beitsch L, Gonsoroski E, Sherchan SP, Uejio CK, Lichtveld MY, Harville EW. Effects of Hurricane Michael on Access to Care for Pregnant Women and Associated Pregnancy Outcomes. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(2):390. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18020390

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pan, Ke, Leslie Beitsch, Elaina Gonsoroski, Samendra P. Sherchan, Christopher K. Uejio, Maureen Y. Lichtveld, and Emily W. Harville 2021. "Effects of Hurricane Michael on Access to Care for Pregnant Women and Associated Pregnancy Outcomes" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 2: 390. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18020390

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