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Open AccessArticle

Assessment of Ambivalent Sexism in University Students in Colombia and Spain: A Comparative Analysis

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Program of Law, Faculty of Social, Political and Humanities, Universidad de Santander, 680003 Bucaramanga, Colombia
2
Applied Economy Department, Rey Juan Carlos University, 28032 Madrid, Spain
3
Nursing Department, School of Nursing, Physiotherapy and Podiatry, University off Seville, 41009 Seville, Spain
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(3), 1009; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18031009
Received: 8 December 2020 / Revised: 12 January 2021 / Accepted: 13 January 2021 / Published: 24 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Mental Health)
(1) Background: Gender-based violence has no geographical, personal, or social boundaries. It constitutes a serious public health problem that affects the entire society. This research aims to identify and compare the level of ambivalent sexism in Spanish and Colombian university students and its relationship with sociodemographic factors. Ambivalent sexism, developed by Glick and Fiske (1996), is considered a new type of sexism since, for the first time, it combines negative and positive feelings that give rise to hostile and benevolent sexism, maintaining the subordination of women through punishment and rewards. (2) Methods: The methodology consisted of the application of the validated Spanish version of the Ambivalent Sexism Inventory (ASI) to a sample of 374 students in their final academic year of the Law program, of which 21.7% were students at the University of Santander (Bucaramanga, Colombia), 45.5% at the University Rey Juan Carlos (Madrid, Spain), and the remaining 32.9% at the University of Seville (Seville, Spain). (3) Results: A high level of ambivalent sexism is reported in Colombian students nowadays. In the two countries. there are similarities (e.g., the great weight of religion and the variation in attitudes towards sexism in people who identify themselves as women, compared to male or students consulted that prefer not to answer) and differences (e.g., absence in Colombia of gender-specific legislation, low number of students who have received gender education in Spain). (4) Conclusions: These findings may contribute to the construction of laws that take into account the particular problems of women and the development of educational programs on gender that are offered in a transversal and permanent way and that take into account cultural factors and equity between men and women as an essential element in the training of future judges who have the legal responsibility to protect those who report gender violence. View Full-Text
Keywords: sexual education; knowledge of sexuality; ambivalent sexism; university; gender-based violence; sexism sexual education; knowledge of sexuality; ambivalent sexism; university; gender-based violence; sexism
MDPI and ACS Style

Rodríguez-Burbano, A.Y.; Cepeda, I.; Vargas-Martínez, A.M.; De-Diego-Cordero, R. Assessment of Ambivalent Sexism in University Students in Colombia and Spain: A Comparative Analysis. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 1009. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18031009

AMA Style

Rodríguez-Burbano AY, Cepeda I, Vargas-Martínez AM, De-Diego-Cordero R. Assessment of Ambivalent Sexism in University Students in Colombia and Spain: A Comparative Analysis. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(3):1009. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18031009

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rodríguez-Burbano, Aura Y.; Cepeda, Isabel; Vargas-Martínez, Ana M.; De-Diego-Cordero, Rocío. 2021. "Assessment of Ambivalent Sexism in University Students in Colombia and Spain: A Comparative Analysis" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 18, no. 3: 1009. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18031009

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