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Review

Comorbidity of Geo-Helminthes among Malaria Outpatients of the Health Facilities in Ethiopia: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

1
Armauer Hansen Research Institute, Ministry of Health, Addis Ababa 1005, Ethiopia
2
Department of Global Public Health, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden
3
World Health Programme, Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue (UQAT), Rouyn-Noranda, QC J9X5E4, Canada
4
School of Health Sciences, University of Brighton, Brighton BN1 9PH, UK
5
Social Medicine and Global Health, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, 221 00 Lund, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Co-first author.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(3), 862; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18030862
Received: 30 November 2020 / Revised: 7 January 2021 / Accepted: 10 January 2021 / Published: 20 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ensure Healthy Lives and Promote Wellbeing for All at All Ages)
Background: Coinfection of malaria and intestinal helminths affects one third of the global population, largely among communities with severe poverty. The spread of these parasitic infections overlays in several epidemiological locations and the host shows different outcomes. This systematic review and meta-analysis determine the pooled prevalence of malaria and intestinal helminthiases coinfections among malaria suspected patients in Ethiopia. Methods: Primary studies published in English language were retrieved using appropriate search terms on Google Scholar, PubMed/MEDLINE, CINHAL, Scopus, and Embase. The Joanna Briggs Institute Meta-Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument (JBI-MAStARI) was used for critical appraisal of studies. A pooled statistical meta-analysis was conducted using STATA Version 14.0 software. The heterogeneity and publication bias were assessed using the I2 statistics and Egger’s test, respectively. Duval and Tweedie’s nonparametric trim and fill analysis using the random-effect analysis. The Random effects model was used to estimate the summary prevalence of comorbidity of malaria and soil transmitted helminthiases and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). The review protocol has registered in PROSPERO number CRD42019144803. Results: We identified ten studies (n = 6633 participants) in this study. The overall pooled result showed 13% of the ambulatory patients infected by malaria and intestinal helminths concurrently in Ethiopia. The pooled prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax, and mixed infections were 12, 30, and 6%, respectively. The most common intestinal helminth parasites detected were Hookworm, Ascaris lumbricoides, and Tirchuris trichiura. Conclusions: The comorbidity of malaria and intestinal helminths causes lower hemoglobin level leading to maternal anemia, preterm delivery, and still birth in pregnant women and lactating mother. School-aged children and neonates coinfected by plasmodium species and soil transmitted helminths develop cognitive impairment, protein energy malnutrition, low birth weight, small for gestational age, and gross motor delay. The Ministry of Health of Ethiopia and its international partners working on malaria elimination programs should give more emphasis to the effect of the interface of malaria and soil transmitted helminths, which calls for an integrated disease control and prevention. View Full-Text
Keywords: coinfection/comorbidity; intestinal helminthiases; malaria; outpatient; Ethiopia coinfection/comorbidity; intestinal helminthiases; malaria; outpatient; Ethiopia
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MDPI and ACS Style

Boltena, M.T.; El-Khatib, Z.; Sahlemichael Kebede, A.; Asamoah, B.O.; Tadesse Boltena, A.; Yeshambaw, M.; Biru, M. Comorbidity of Geo-Helminthes among Malaria Outpatients of the Health Facilities in Ethiopia: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 862. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18030862

AMA Style

Boltena MT, El-Khatib Z, Sahlemichael Kebede A, Asamoah BO, Tadesse Boltena A, Yeshambaw M, Biru M. Comorbidity of Geo-Helminthes among Malaria Outpatients of the Health Facilities in Ethiopia: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(3):862. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18030862

Chicago/Turabian Style

Boltena, Minyahil T., Ziad El-Khatib, Abraham Sahlemichael Kebede, Benedict O. Asamoah, Andualem Tadesse Boltena, Melese Yeshambaw, and Mulatu Biru. 2021. "Comorbidity of Geo-Helminthes among Malaria Outpatients of the Health Facilities in Ethiopia: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 3: 862. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18030862

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