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Article

Residential Greenspace and Urban Adolescent Substance Use: Exploring Interactive Effects with Peer Network Health, Sex, and Executive Function

1
Department of Geography and Urban Studies, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122, USA
2
Department of Geography, Planning, and Sustainability, Rowan University, Glassboro, NJ 08028, USA
3
Center for Behavioral Health Research, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1611; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18041611
Received: 17 January 2021 / Revised: 3 February 2021 / Accepted: 4 February 2021 / Published: 8 February 2021
While urban greenspace is increasingly recognized as important to mental health, its role in substance use is understudied. This exploratory study investigates the interaction of greenspace with peer network health, sex, and executive function (EF) in models of substance use among a sample of disadvantaged, urban youth. Adolescents and their parents were recruited from a hospital in the mid-Atlantic region of the U.S. Residential greenspace at the streetscape level was derived from analysis of Google Street View imagery. Logistic regression models were used to test the moderating effect of greenspace on the association between peer network health and substance use, as well as additional moderating effects of sex and EF. The significant negative association of peer network health with substance use occurred only among youth residing in high greenspace environments, a moderating effect which was stronger among youth with high EF deficit. The moderating effect of greenspace did not differ between girls and boys. Greenspace may play an important role in moderating peer influences on substance use among disadvantaged, urban adolescents, and such moderation may differ according to an individual’s level of EF. This research provides evidence of differences in environmental susceptibility regarding contextual mechanisms of substance use among youth, and it informs the development of targeted substance use interventions that leverage social and environmental influences on adolescent substance use. View Full-Text
Keywords: greenspace; mental health; substance use; peers; executive function; environmental susceptibility; differential susceptibility; adolescents greenspace; mental health; substance use; peers; executive function; environmental susceptibility; differential susceptibility; adolescents
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mennis, J.; Li, X.; Meenar, M.; Coatsworth, J.D.; McKeon, T.P.; Mason, M.J. Residential Greenspace and Urban Adolescent Substance Use: Exploring Interactive Effects with Peer Network Health, Sex, and Executive Function. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 1611. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18041611

AMA Style

Mennis J, Li X, Meenar M, Coatsworth JD, McKeon TP, Mason MJ. Residential Greenspace and Urban Adolescent Substance Use: Exploring Interactive Effects with Peer Network Health, Sex, and Executive Function. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(4):1611. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18041611

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mennis, Jeremy, Xiaojiang Li, Mahbubur Meenar, J. D. Coatsworth, Thomas P. McKeon, and Michael J. Mason. 2021. "Residential Greenspace and Urban Adolescent Substance Use: Exploring Interactive Effects with Peer Network Health, Sex, and Executive Function" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 4: 1611. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18041611

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