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Article

Is Cycling Practice Related to Men’s Pelvic Floor Dysfunctions? A Hypothesis-Generating Observational Study

1
Department of Nursing Science, Physiotherapy and Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Almeria, 04120 Almeria, Spain
2
Research Group on Methodology, Methods, Models and Outcomes of Health and Social Sciences (M3O), Faculty of Health Sciences and Welfare, University of Vic-Central University of Catalonia (UVIC-UCC), C. Sagrada Familia, 7, 08500 Vic, Spain
3
Department of Psychiatry and Physiotherapy, Institute of Biomedical Research of Malaga (IBIMA), University of Malaga, 29071 Malaga, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Equal contribution.
Academic Editors: Joanne Booth and Britton W. Brewer
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1923; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18041923
Received: 18 December 2020 / Revised: 8 February 2021 / Accepted: 12 February 2021 / Published: 17 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pelvic Health and Human Movement)
Background: There is a lack of consensus with regards to the consequences of cycling practice on urogenital and sexual problems in men. The aim of the study was to analyse the relationship between intensity of cycling practice and urinary tract symptoms, erectile dysfunction, and urinary incontinence. Methods: Observational hypothesis-generating design. Cyclists, men, between 25 and 70 years who had been cycling for more than one year were included. During the statistical analysis, a multiple linear regression model, partial correlation and Spearman’s correlation were carried out. Results: Fifty-eight men participated in the study. Results showed that there is a correlation between years of cycling and prostate symptoms (p = 0.041), and between age and erectile dysfunction (p = 0.001). The multiple linear regression model and the partial correlation analysis showed a correlation between the years of cycling and prostate symptoms (p = 0.007 and p = 0.018). Conclusions: The results have shown that there is a slight correlation between the years of cycling and the presence of lower urinary tract symptoms, independently of the man’s age. Therefore, the results display that high-intensity cycling practice might impact negatively in some men’s pelvic floor functions. Further research is needed to analyse the impact of cycling on urogenital problems in this population group. View Full-Text
Keywords: pelvic floor; urinary incontinence; erectile dysfunction; cycling pelvic floor; urinary incontinence; erectile dysfunction; cycling
MDPI and ACS Style

Molina-Torres, G.; Ochandorena-Acha, M.; Echazarreta-Aparicio, Y.; Sánchez-Labraca, N.; González-Sánchez, M.; Terradas-Monllor, M.; Varela-Vásquez, L.A.; Merchán-Baeza, J.A.; Minobes-Molina, E. Is Cycling Practice Related to Men’s Pelvic Floor Dysfunctions? A Hypothesis-Generating Observational Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 1923. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18041923

AMA Style

Molina-Torres G, Ochandorena-Acha M, Echazarreta-Aparicio Y, Sánchez-Labraca N, González-Sánchez M, Terradas-Monllor M, Varela-Vásquez LA, Merchán-Baeza JA, Minobes-Molina E. Is Cycling Practice Related to Men’s Pelvic Floor Dysfunctions? A Hypothesis-Generating Observational Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(4):1923. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18041923

Chicago/Turabian Style

Molina-Torres, Guadalupe, Mirari Ochandorena-Acha, Yune Echazarreta-Aparicio, Nuria Sánchez-Labraca, Manuel González-Sánchez, Marc Terradas-Monllor, Luz A. Varela-Vásquez, Jose A. Merchán-Baeza, and Eduard Minobes-Molina. 2021. "Is Cycling Practice Related to Men’s Pelvic Floor Dysfunctions? A Hypothesis-Generating Observational Study" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 4: 1923. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18041923

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