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Article

Who Guides Vaccination in the Portuguese Press? An Analysis of Information Sources

1
Institute of Collective Health, Federal University of Bahia, Salvador 40.110-040, Brazil
2
Research Group for Communication, Health and Education, Department of Public Health, São Paulo State University, Botucatu 18.618-686, Brazil
3
Department of Communication and Media Studies, Madrid University Carlos III, 28903 Madrid, Spain
4
Health Research Centre, University of Almeria, 04120 Almeria, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 2189; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18042189
Received: 18 January 2021 / Revised: 15 February 2021 / Accepted: 18 February 2021 / Published: 23 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Communication and Public Health)
Sources of information are a key part of the news process as it guides certain topics, influencing the media agenda. The goal of this study is to examine the most frequent voices on vaccines in the Portuguese press. A total of 300 news items were analysed via content analysis using as sources two newspapers from 2012 to 2017. Of all the articles, 97.7% included a source (n = 670). The most frequent were “governmental organisations”, “professional associations” and the “media”. Less frequent sources were “university scientists”, “governmental scientific bodies”, “consumer groups”, “doctors”, “scientific companies”, “NGOs” and “scientific journals”. Most articles used only non-scientific sources (n = 156). A total of 94 articles used both categories and 43 used exclusively scientific sources. Our findings support the assertion that media can be an instrument to disseminate information on vaccines. Nevertheless, despite being present in most articles, the number of sources per article was low, therefore not presenting a diversity of opinions and there was a lack of scientific voices, thus suggesting lower quality of the information being offered to the audience. View Full-Text
Keywords: content analysis; media; newspaper; public health; sources; journalism; vaccine content analysis; media; newspaper; public health; sources; journalism; vaccine
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MDPI and ACS Style

Langbecker, A.; Catalan-Matamoros, D. Who Guides Vaccination in the Portuguese Press? An Analysis of Information Sources. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 2189. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18042189

AMA Style

Langbecker A, Catalan-Matamoros D. Who Guides Vaccination in the Portuguese Press? An Analysis of Information Sources. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(4):2189. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18042189

Chicago/Turabian Style

Langbecker, Andrea, and Daniel Catalan-Matamoros. 2021. "Who Guides Vaccination in the Portuguese Press? An Analysis of Information Sources" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 4: 2189. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph18042189

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