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Current Oncology is published by MDPI from Volume 28 Issue 1 (2021). Previous articles were published by another publisher in Open Access under a CC-BY (or CC-BY-NC-ND) licence, and they are hosted by MDPI on mdpi.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with Multimed Inc..

Curr. Oncol., Volume 16, Issue 3 (May 2009) – 11 articles

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Article
High-Grade Hyperinvasive Sarcomatoid Urothelial Bladder Carcinoma Demonstrating Complete Response to Bladder-Preserving Chemoradiation
Curr. Oncol. 2009, 16(3), 55-57; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3747/co.v16i3.396 - 01 May 2009
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 129
Abstract
The standard treatment for locally advanced urothelial bladder carcinoma is radical cystectomy or chemoradiation. Sarcomatoid urothelial carcinoma, a rare tumour, is treated with radical cystectomy because the response to radiation therapy alone is poor in other sarcomas. We report a case of high-grade [...] Read more.
The standard treatment for locally advanced urothelial bladder carcinoma is radical cystectomy or chemoradiation. Sarcomatoid urothelial carcinoma, a rare tumour, is treated with radical cystectomy because the response to radiation therapy alone is poor in other sarcomas. We report a case of high-grade hyperinvasive urothelial bladder carcinoma with sarcomatoid differentiation. The patient refused cystectomy, and so a chemoradiation regimen was devised for her treatment. She completed the regimen and has since demonstrated a complete response to chemoradiation therapy clinically and pathologically by biopsy. The patient has therefore been able to attain a complete response while preserving a functional bladder. Full article
Article
Novel Developments in Angiogenesis Cancer Therapy
Curr. Oncol. 2009, 16(3), 50-54; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3747/co.v16i3.444 - 01 May 2009
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 81
Abstract
A greater understanding of the factors and pathways controlling angiogenesis in tumours has allowed the development of a number of agents that selectively inhibit the pathways mediating that activity. The results to date of clinical trials with such agents and future research opportunities [...] Read more.
A greater understanding of the factors and pathways controlling angiogenesis in tumours has allowed the development of a number of agents that selectively inhibit the pathways mediating that activity. The results to date of clinical trials with such agents and future research opportunities are reviewed. Full article
Article
Exosomes in Tumour Immunity
Curr. Oncol. 2009, 16(3), 46-49; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3747/co.v16i3.367 - 01 May 2009
Cited by 79 | Viewed by 215
Abstract
Exosomes are nanometre-size vesicles manufactured within late multi-vesicular endosomes and actively secreted into the extracellular environment [...] Full article
Article
The Emerging Role of IG-IMRT for Palliative Radiotherapy: A Single-Institution Experience
Curr. Oncol. 2009, 16(3), 40-45; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3747/co.v16i3.304 - 01 May 2009
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 109
Abstract
Many modern radiotherapy centers now have image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (ig-imrt) tools available for clinical use, and the technique offers many options for patients requiring palliative radiotherapy. We describe a single-institution experience with ig-imrt for short-course palliative radiotherapy, highlighting the unique situations [...] Read more.
Many modern radiotherapy centers now have image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (ig-imrt) tools available for clinical use, and the technique offers many options for patients requiring palliative radiotherapy. We describe a single-institution experience with ig-imrt for short-course palliative radiotherapy, highlighting the unique situations in which the technique can be most effectively used. Full article
Article
Informational Stories: A Complementary Strategy for Patients and Caregivers with Brain Metastases
Curr. Oncol. 2009, 16(3), 33-39; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3747/co.v16i3.397 - 01 May 2009
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 129
Abstract
Objective: We compared the efficacy of a story-based writing style with that of a fact-based writing style for educational material on brain metastases. Methods: Identical informational content on four topics—radiation therapy, side effects, steroid tapering, and palliative care—was constructed into equivalent story-based and [...] Read more.
Objective: We compared the efficacy of a story-based writing style with that of a fact-based writing style for educational material on brain metastases. Methods: Identical informational content on four topics—radiation therapy, side effects, steroid tapering, and palliative care—was constructed into equivalent story-based and fact-based materials. The content and reader preference for style were evaluated using a questionnaire of 20 + 1 items. Cancer patients and caregivers were invited to evaluate the materials. Results: A total of 47 participants completed the questionnaire. The recorded preferences for facts, stories, or both were 42%, 7%, and 51% respectively (p = 0.0004). The fact-based materials were rated superior in providing factual information (for example, discussion of treatment, side effects) and selected general characteristics (clarity of information, for instance). A rating trend suggested that story-based materials were superior in describing “how it feels to have brain metastases” (21/40 fact-based vs. 26/43 story-based) and “how brain metastases affected a spouse” (17/41 fact-based vs. 21/47 story-based), and in being “sensitive to the frustrations of a patient with brain metastases” (25/40 fact-based vs. 30/44 story-based). Conclusions: Half the participants preferred to read both fact-based and story-based materials. A combined story-based and fact-based educational resource may be more effective in conveying sensitive information and should be further investigated. Full article
Article
“This is a kind of Betrayal”: A Qualitative Study of Disability after Breast Cancer
Curr. Oncol. 2009, 16(3), 26-32; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3747/co.v16i3.389 - 01 May 2009
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 103
Abstract
Objective: We proposed to document the effect of arm morbidity and disability in 40 Canadian women who were 12–24 months post breast cancer surgery. Methods: We completed 40 qualitative interviews as one component of a multidisciplinary national longitudinal study of arm morbidity after [...] Read more.
Objective: We proposed to document the effect of arm morbidity and disability in 40 Canadian women who were 12–24 months post breast cancer surgery. Methods: We completed 40 qualitative interviews as one component of a multidisciplinary national longitudinal study of arm morbidity after breast cancer (n = 745) involving four research sites (Fredericton/Saint John, Montreal, Winnipeg, Surrey). During semi-structured interviews, participants who had reported arm morbidity and disability in earlier surveys were asked to discuss the effects of these conditions on everyday life. Results: The interviewees reported making major adjustments to paid and unpaid work, which often involved the assistance of family members, thus demonstrating the effect of disability. Interview data resulted in the creation of a model that addresses arm morbidity and disability, and that holds implications for health care professionals. Conclusions: Based on the interview findings, we conclude that a robust measure of disability after breast cancer should be developed. In the absence of a validated measure of the effect of disability, evaluating qualitative responses to questions about everyday activities could provide the impetus for provision of physical therapy and emotional support. Full article
Article
Hormone Replacement Therapy and Outcomes for Women with Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Can An Association be Confirmed?
Curr. Oncol. 2009, 16(3), 21-25; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3747/co.v16i4.465 - 01 May 2009
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 164
Abstract
Background: A recent report suggested that women who had been taking hormone replacement therapy (hrt) experienced significantly decreased survival after a lung cancer diagnosis. Given the large cohort of women who have received hrt, it is important to try to [...] Read more.
Background: A recent report suggested that women who had been taking hormone replacement therapy (hrt) experienced significantly decreased survival after a lung cancer diagnosis. Given the large cohort of women who have received hrt, it is important to try to confirm that association. Methods: We reviewed female patients diagnosed with lung cancer at our institution between January 1999 and December 2003 for age at diagnosis, disease stage, treatment, smoking history, hrt, performance status, weight loss, age at menopause, and overall survival. Patients were excluded if they had small-cell lung cancer or an unknown primary cancer, or if they had had previous or synchronous non-lung, non-skin cancers. Statistical analysis used the chi-square test for categorical variables and the Kaplan–Meier method and Cox regression model for univariate and multivariate analyses of overall survival. Results: Of 397 eligible patients, most (68%) were stage iii or iv. The group included very few never-smokers (5%). The proportion of patients with experience of prior or current hrt was 29%, and no effect on overall survival was observed. Median survival was 13 months in the non-hrt group and 14 months in the hrt group. Significant factors predicting for overall survival included performance status, stage, and weight loss. Conclusions: Stage, performance status, and weight loss are the most powerful predictors of survival for women with non-small-cell lung cancer. As compared with non-hrt users, patients with prior hrt use did not have inferior outcomes, failing to duplicate previously published results. Full article
Article
Optimal Use of Taxanes in Metastatic Breast Cancer
Curr. Oncol. 2009, 16(3), 8-20; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3747/co.v16i3.377 - 01 May 2009
Cited by 26 | Viewed by 107
Abstract
The role of taxanes in the treatment of breast cancer is becoming increasingly important. In clinical practice, the taxanes are now standard therapy in both early-stage and metastatic breast cancer. Since the 1990s, multiple randomized clinical trials have been evaluating the efficacy of [...] Read more.
The role of taxanes in the treatment of breast cancer is becoming increasingly important. In clinical practice, the taxanes are now standard therapy in both early-stage and metastatic breast cancer. Since the 1990s, multiple randomized clinical trials have been evaluating the efficacy of taxanes in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. These trials have included treatment with taxanes alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents. Pre-existing published guidelines for the use of taxanes in the management of metastatic breast cancer are available. The mandate of the Alberta Cancer Board Provincial Breast Tumour Group Guideline Panel was to consider and adapt the recommendations of the existing guidelines and to develop de novo guidelines to account for current evidence. For this task, the panel used the adapte process, which is a systematic process of guideline adaptation developed by the adapte Collaboration. The recommendations formulated by the panel included the identification of taxane regimens that could be offered in anthracycline-naïve patients, anthracycline-pretreated or -resistant patients, and patients overexpressing the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Potential toxicities and benefits in terms of time to progression, progression-free survival, overall survival, and quality of life were also considered. Full article
Letter
Might Positron Emission Tomography Actually Treat Micrometastatic Cancer?
Curr. Oncol. 2009, 16(3), 7; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3747/co.v16i3.373 - 01 May 2009
Viewed by 84
Abstract
We read the interesting pilot study of Dr. Nayot and colleagues on the use of preoperative 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (fdg-pet) with computed tomography (ct) scanning to detect metastatic nodes in subjects with endometrial [...] Full article
Editorial
Adjuvant Interferon Alfa for Melanoma: New Evidence-Based Treatment Recommendations?
Curr. Oncol. 2009, 16(3), 3-6; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3747/co.v16i3.447 - 01 May 2009
Cited by 30 | Viewed by 114
Abstract
Malignant melanoma of the skin is the most frequent cause of mortality in skin cancer. Despite various efforts toward increased early detection and prevention of melanoma, approximately 20% of patients will die because of disseminated metastases. [...] Full article
Editorial
Screening for Prostate Cancer: Controversy? What Controversy?
Curr. Oncol. 2009, 16(3), 1-2; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3747/co.v16i3.459 - 01 May 2009
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 92
Abstract
The purpose of screening is to identify preclinical and asymptomatic cases of a disease in a population at risk—as opposed to making a diagnosis based on a patient’s presentation with symptoms and disease. [...] Full article
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