Next Article in Journal
egfr Overexpression in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Penis
Previous Article in Journal
Inter-Institutional Pathology Consultations for Breast Cancer: Impact on Clinical Oncology Therapy Recommendations
Current Oncology is published by MDPI from Volume 28 Issue 1 (2021). Previous articles were published by another publisher in Open Access under a CC-BY (or CC-BY-NC-ND) licence, and they are hosted by MDPI on mdpi.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with Multimed Inc..
Article

Has the Practice of Radiation Oncology for Locally Advanced and Metastatic Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Changed in Canada?

by 1,*, 1,*, 2 and 3
1
Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, ON M5G 2M9, Canada
2
Department of Biostatistics, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada
3
Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 9 November 2009 / Revised: 15 December 2009 / Accepted: 2 January 2010 / Published: 1 February 2010
Aim: Previous surveys have revealed wide variations in the management by radiation oncologists of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in Canada. The aim of the present study was to determine the current patterns of practice for locally advanced and metastatic NSCLC among Canadian radiation oncologists. Materials and Methods: An online survey was distributed electronically to all members of the Canadian Association of Radiation Oncologists. Those who treat lung cancer were invited to participate. The survey consisted of three scenarios focusing on areas of NSCLC treatment in which the radiotherapy (RT) regimen that provides the best therapeutic ratio is unclear. Results: Replies from 41 respondents were analyzed. For an asymptomatic patient with stage IIIB NSCLC unsuitable for radical treatment, 22% recommended immediate RT, and 78% recommended RT only if the patient were to become symptomatic. Those who believed that immediate rt prolongs survival were more likely to recommend it (p = 0.028). For a patient with a bulky stage IIIB tumour and good performance status, 39% recommended palliative treatment, and 61% recommended radical treatment (84% concurrent vs. 16% sequential chemoradiation at 60–66 Gy in 30–33 fractions). Those who believed that chemoradiation has a greater impact on survival were more likely to recommend it (p < 0.001). For a symptomatic patient with stage IV NSCLC, 54% recommended external-beam RT (EBRT) alone, 41% recommended other modalities (brachytherapy, endobronchial therapy, or chemotherapy) with or without EBRT, and 5% recommended best supportive care. A majority (76%) prescribed 20 Gy in 5 fractions for EBRT. Conclusions: Compared with previous surveys, more radiation oncologists now offer radical treatment for locally advanced NSCLC. Management of NSCLC in Canada may be evidence-based, but perception by radiation oncologists of the treatment’s impact on survival also influences treatment decisions.
Keywords: non-small-cell lung cancer; palliation; radiation; survey non-small-cell lung cancer; palliation; radiation; survey
MDPI and ACS Style

Han, K.; Bezjak, A.; Xu, W.; Kane, G. Has the Practice of Radiation Oncology for Locally Advanced and Metastatic Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Changed in Canada? Curr. Oncol. 2010, 17, 33-40. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3747/co.v17i4.567

AMA Style

Han K, Bezjak A, Xu W, Kane G. Has the Practice of Radiation Oncology for Locally Advanced and Metastatic Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Changed in Canada? Current Oncology. 2010; 17(1):33-40. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3747/co.v17i4.567

Chicago/Turabian Style

Han, K., A. Bezjak, W. Xu, and G. Kane 2010. "Has the Practice of Radiation Oncology for Locally Advanced and Metastatic Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Changed in Canada?" Current Oncology 17, no. 1: 33-40. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3747/co.v17i4.567

Find Other Styles

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Only visits after 24 November 2015 are recorded.
Back to TopTop