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Article

Reflecting on Palliative Care Integration in Canada: A Qualitative Report

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Werklund School of Education, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada
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Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Alberta Health Services, Calgary, AB T2N 4N2, Canada
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Department of Medicine, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3J7, Canada
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Department of Medicine, Lakeridge Health, Ajax, ON L1S 2J4, Canada
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Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 4N1, Canada
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Palliative Medicine, Queens University, Kingston, ON K7L 3J7, Canada
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Department of Psychiatry, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 2T9, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 28 April 2021 / Revised: 4 July 2021 / Accepted: 16 July 2021 / Published: 19 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Palliative and Supportive Care)
Studies have identified integrated interdisciplinary care as a hallmark of effective palliative care. Although models attempt to show how integration may function, there is little literature available that practically explores how integration is fostered and maintained. In this study we asked palliative care clinicians across Canada to comment on how services are integrated across the healthcare system. This is an analysis of qualitative data from a larger study, wherein clinicians provided written responses regarding their experiences. Content analysis was used to identify response categories. Clinicians (n = 14) included physicians, a nurse and a social worker from six provinces. They identified the benefits of formalized relationships and collaboration pathways with other services to streamline referral and consultation. Clinicians perceived a need for better training of residents and primary care physicians in the community and more acceptance, shared understanding, and referrals. Clinicians also described integrating well with oncology departments. Lastly, clinicians considered integration a complex process with departmental, provincial, and national involvement. The needs and strengths identified by the clinicians mirror the qualities of successfully integrated palliative care programs globally and highlight specific areas in policy, education, practice, and research that could benefit those in Canada. View Full-Text
Keywords: palliative care; integration; collaboration; interdisciplinary; palliative care teams; palliative approach; palliative care model palliative care; integration; collaboration; interdisciplinary; palliative care teams; palliative approach; palliative care model
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MDPI and ACS Style

Qureshi, M.; Robinson, M.C.; Sinnarajah, A.; Chary, S.; de Groot, J.M.; Feldstain, A. Reflecting on Palliative Care Integration in Canada: A Qualitative Report. Curr. Oncol. 2021, 28, 2753-2762. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/curroncol28040240

AMA Style

Qureshi M, Robinson MC, Sinnarajah A, Chary S, de Groot JM, Feldstain A. Reflecting on Palliative Care Integration in Canada: A Qualitative Report. Current Oncology. 2021; 28(4):2753-2762. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/curroncol28040240

Chicago/Turabian Style

Qureshi, Maryam, Maggie C. Robinson, Aynharan Sinnarajah, Srini Chary, Janet M. de Groot, and Andrea Feldstain. 2021. "Reflecting on Palliative Care Integration in Canada: A Qualitative Report" Current Oncology 28, no. 4: 2753-2762. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/curroncol28040240

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