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Article

Modelling ATR-FTIR Spectra of Dental Bonding Systems to Investigate Composition and Polymerisation Kinetics

1
Division of Biomaterials & Tissue Engineering, UCL Eastman Dental Institute, London NW3 2PF, UK
2
Clinical Research Unit, Centro de Investigação Interdisciplinar Egas Moniz (CiiEM), Instituto Universitário Egas Moniz (IUEM), 2829-511 Caparica, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Giovanna Orsini
Received: 18 January 2021 / Revised: 1 February 2021 / Accepted: 3 February 2021 / Published: 5 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Biomaterials and Technology for Dental Clinical Applications)
Component ratios and kinetics are key to understanding and optimising novel formulations. This warrants investigation of valid methods. Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infra-Red (ATR)-FTIR spectra of separate primers/adhesives were modelled using summed spectra of solvents (water, ethanol), methacrylate monomers (HEMA (hydroxyethyl methacrylate), Bis-GMA (bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate), and 10-MDP (10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate)), and fillers, multiplied by varying fractions. Filler loads were obtained following their separation from the adhesives, by analysing three repetitions (n = 3). Spectral changes during light exposure at 37 °C (20 s, LED 1100–1330 mW/cm2) were used to determine polymerisation kinetics (n = 3). Independent samples T-test was used for statistical analysis (significance level of 5%). FTIR modelling suggested a primer solvent percentage of OBFL (Optibond FL) (30%) was half that of CFSE (Clearfil SE 2) (60%). OBFL included ethanol and water, while CFSE included only water. Monomer peaks were largely those of HEMA with lower levels of phosphate monomers. OBFL/CFSE adhesive model spectra suggested that both contained equal volumes of Bis-GMA/HEMA, with CFSE having 10-MDP. Filler levels and spectra from OBFL (48 wt.%) and CFSE (5 wt.%) were different. Both systems reached a 50% conversion rate within seconds of light exposure. The final conversion for OBFL (74 ± 1%) was lower compared to CFSE (79 ± 2%) (p < 0.05). ATR-FTIR is a useful method to investigate relative levels of main components in bonding systems and their polymerisation kinetics. Such information is valuable to understanding such behaviour. View Full-Text
Keywords: dental adhesives; FTIR; infra-red spectroscopy; photopolymerisation; prediction model dental adhesives; FTIR; infra-red spectroscopy; photopolymerisation; prediction model
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MDPI and ACS Style

Delgado, A.H.; Young, A.M. Modelling ATR-FTIR Spectra of Dental Bonding Systems to Investigate Composition and Polymerisation Kinetics. Materials 2021, 14, 760. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ma14040760

AMA Style

Delgado AH, Young AM. Modelling ATR-FTIR Spectra of Dental Bonding Systems to Investigate Composition and Polymerisation Kinetics. Materials. 2021; 14(4):760. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ma14040760

Chicago/Turabian Style

Delgado, António H., and Anne M. Young 2021. "Modelling ATR-FTIR Spectra of Dental Bonding Systems to Investigate Composition and Polymerisation Kinetics" Materials 14, no. 4: 760. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ma14040760

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