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Article

Testing the Effect of Snag and Cavity Supply on Deadwood-Associated Species in a Managed Boreal Forest

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Département des Sciences Fondamentales, Université du Québec à Chicoutimi, 555 Boulevard de l’Université, Chicoutimi, QC G7H 2B1, Canada
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Bureau Environnement et terre d’Odanak, Conseil des Abénakis d’Odanak, 104 rue Sibosis, Odanak, Qc J0G 1H0, Canada
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Science and Technology Branch, Environment and Climate Change Canada, 1550 Avenue d’Estimauville, Québec, QC G1J 0C3, Canada
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Laurentian Forestry Centre, Natural Resources Canada, 1055 rue du P.E.P.S., Québec, QC G1V4C7, Canada
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School of Agricultural, Forest and Food Sciences HAFL, Bern University of Applied Sciences, Länggasse 85, 3052 Zollikofen, Switzerland
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Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL, Zücherstrasse 111, 8903 Birmensdorf, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 16 March 2020 / Revised: 30 March 2020 / Accepted: 4 April 2020 / Published: 9 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Forest Ecology and Management)
Standing deadwood is an important attribute of old-growth boreal forests and it provides essential microhabitats for deadwood-associated species. In managed boreal forests, short rotations tend to limit the amount and diversity of standing deadwood. This study evaluates if the anthropogenic supply of deadwood attributes through tree girdling or by providing nest boxes may favor deadwood-associated species. We studied the short-term response of saproxylic beetles, foraging woodpeckers, and secondary cavity users to snag and cavity supply in 50 to 70-year-old black spruce stands. In spring 2015, we girdled 8000 black spruce according to two spatial distributions (uniform and clustered), and we also installed 450 nest boxes of six different sizes at three distances from the forest edge. Using trunk window traps, we captured significantly more beetles in sites with girdled trees than in control sites in both 2015 and 2016. We also recorded a trend of a greater abundance of beetles in clusters of girdled trees than within uniformly distributed girdled trees. Trypodendron lineatum (Oliver) dominated beetle assemblages, representing 88.5% of all species in 2015 and 74.6% in 2016. The number of beetles captured was 7× higher in 2015 than in 2016. In contrast, we observed greater amounts of woodpecker foraging marks in fall 2016 than in either fall 2015 or spring 2016. Woodpeckers foraged significantly more in clusters of girdled trees than within uniformly distributed girdled trees. Woodpeckers’ foraging mark presence was positively associated with the proportion of recent cuts at 1 km around the study sites. Five Boreal Chickadee (Poecile hudsonicus Forster) pairs used nest boxes and occupied smaller box sizes that were located away from the forest edge. Our study showed that structural enrichment can be effective in rapidly attracting deadwood-associated species within managed forest stands. View Full-Text
Keywords: deadwood; cavity; woodpeckers; saproxylic insects; nest box; Trypodendron lineatum deadwood; cavity; woodpeckers; saproxylic insects; nest box; Trypodendron lineatum
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MDPI and ACS Style

Dufour-Pelletier, S.; A. Tremblay, J.; Hébert, C.; Lachat, T.; Ibarzabal, J. Testing the Effect of Snag and Cavity Supply on Deadwood-Associated Species in a Managed Boreal Forest. Forests 2020, 11, 424. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/f11040424

AMA Style

Dufour-Pelletier S, A. Tremblay J, Hébert C, Lachat T, Ibarzabal J. Testing the Effect of Snag and Cavity Supply on Deadwood-Associated Species in a Managed Boreal Forest. Forests. 2020; 11(4):424. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/f11040424

Chicago/Turabian Style

Dufour-Pelletier, Samuel, Junior A. Tremblay, Christian Hébert, Thibault Lachat, and Jacques Ibarzabal. 2020. "Testing the Effect of Snag and Cavity Supply on Deadwood-Associated Species in a Managed Boreal Forest" Forests 11, no. 4: 424. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/f11040424

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