Next Article in Journal
Amphipathic Peptide Antibiotics with Potent Activity against Multidrug-Resistant Pathogens
Previous Article in Journal
Mixed Pluronic—Cremophor Polymeric Micelles as Nanocarriers for Poorly Soluble Antibiotics—The Influence on the Antibacterial Activity
Previous Article in Special Issue
Endogenous Antioxidant Cocktail Loaded Hydrogel for Topical Wound Healing of Burns
Article

Evaluation and Comparison of Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLNs) and Nanostructured Lipid Carriers (NLCs) as Vectors to Develop Hydrochlorothiazide Effective and Safe Pediatric Oral Liquid Formulations

1
Department of Chemistry, University of Florence, via Schiff 6, Sesto Fiorentino, 50019 Florence, Italy
2
Department of Neurofarba, University of Florence, Viale Pieraccini 6, 50139 Florence, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Luigi Battaglia
Received: 12 March 2021 / Accepted: 20 March 2021 / Published: 24 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nano-Micro Encapsulation of Drugs)
The aim of this study was the optimization of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) in terms of physicochemical and biopharmaceutical properties, to develop effective and stable aqueous liquid formulations of hydrochlorothiazide, suitable for paediatric therapy, overcoming its low-solubility and poor-stability problems. Based on solubility studies, Precirol® ATO5 and Transcutol® HP were used as solid and liquid lipids, respectively. The effect of different surfactants, also in different combinations and at different amounts, on particle size, homogeneity and surface-charge of nanoparticles was carefully investigated. The best formulations were selected for drug loading, and evaluated also for entrapment efficiency and release behaviour. For both SLN and NLC series, the use of Gelucire® 44/14 as surfactant rather than PluronicF68 or Tween® 80 yielded a marked particle size reduction (95–75 nm compared to around 600–400 nm), and an improvement in entrapment efficiency and drug release rate. NLC showed a better performance than SLN, reaching about 90% entrapped drug (vs. 80%) and more than 90% drug released after 300 min (vs. about 65%). All selected formulations showed good physical stability during 6-month storage at 4 °C, but a higher loss of encapsulated drug was found for SLNs (15%) than for NLCs (<5%). Moreover, all selected formulations revealed the absence of any cytotoxic effect, as assessed by a cell-viability test on Caco-2 cells and are able to pass the intestinal epithelium as suggested by Caco-2 uptake experiments. View Full-Text
Keywords: solid lipid nanoparticles; nanostructured lipid carriers; hydrochlorothiazide; pediatric therapy; Gelucire; cytotoxicity; cellular uptake solid lipid nanoparticles; nanostructured lipid carriers; hydrochlorothiazide; pediatric therapy; Gelucire; cytotoxicity; cellular uptake
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Mura, P.; Maestrelli, F.; D’Ambrosio, M.; Luceri, C.; Cirri, M. Evaluation and Comparison of Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLNs) and Nanostructured Lipid Carriers (NLCs) as Vectors to Develop Hydrochlorothiazide Effective and Safe Pediatric Oral Liquid Formulations. Pharmaceutics 2021, 13, 437. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/pharmaceutics13040437

AMA Style

Mura P, Maestrelli F, D’Ambrosio M, Luceri C, Cirri M. Evaluation and Comparison of Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLNs) and Nanostructured Lipid Carriers (NLCs) as Vectors to Develop Hydrochlorothiazide Effective and Safe Pediatric Oral Liquid Formulations. Pharmaceutics. 2021; 13(4):437. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/pharmaceutics13040437

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mura, Paola, Francesca Maestrelli, Mario D’Ambrosio, Cristina Luceri, and Marzia Cirri. 2021. "Evaluation and Comparison of Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLNs) and Nanostructured Lipid Carriers (NLCs) as Vectors to Develop Hydrochlorothiazide Effective and Safe Pediatric Oral Liquid Formulations" Pharmaceutics 13, no. 4: 437. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/pharmaceutics13040437

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop