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Article

Biomass Growth and Its Control in the Process of Biofiltration of Air Contaminated with Xylene on a Biotrickling Column Filled with Expanded Clay

1
Department of Organic and Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Technology and Engineering, West Pomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin, Al. Piastów 42, 71-065 Szczecin, Poland
2
Department of Heating, Ventilation and Heat Engineering, Faculty of Civil Engineering and Architecture, West Pomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin, Al. Piastów 50, 70-311 Szczecin, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(13), 5412; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12135412
Received: 29 May 2020 / Revised: 29 June 2020 / Accepted: 2 July 2020 / Published: 4 July 2020
Biofiltration of air polluted with xylene vapors was carried out for nearly two years in a large laboratory-scale installation with a volume of the bed of expanded clay equal to 32 dm3. During the experiment, different xylene inlet concentrations were applied, within the range from 300 to over 1500 mg/m3 at a linear gas flow rate of 0.008, 0.016, and 0.033 m/s, as well as 0.12 and 0.24 dm3 of medium dispensed every 3 h on top of the bed. The progress of the process was followed by measuring the xylene concentration at the inlet and outlet of the column, column mass, and gas flow resistance. The capability to purify air polluted with xylene with an average efficiency of approx. 90% was demonstrated. The process was interrupted by a significant increase in gas flow resistance, caused by a large growth of biomass, resulting in an increase in the mass of the bed by more than 45%. Both intensive rinsing of the bed with a stream of water, causing its fluidization, and rinsing and mixing after removing the bed from the column allowed to reduce flow resistance to a value close to the initial one. To ensure the supply of biogenic elements, it was necessary to periodically spray the bed with a solution of the medium in an amount of up to about 0.1 dm3/h/m3 of purified air. View Full-Text
Keywords: biofiltration; xylene; biomass accumulation; biotrickling; backwashing; expanded clay biofiltration; xylene; biomass accumulation; biotrickling; backwashing; expanded clay
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MDPI and ACS Style

Turała, A.; Wieczorek, A. Biomass Growth and Its Control in the Process of Biofiltration of Air Contaminated with Xylene on a Biotrickling Column Filled with Expanded Clay. Sustainability 2020, 12, 5412. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12135412

AMA Style

Turała A, Wieczorek A. Biomass Growth and Its Control in the Process of Biofiltration of Air Contaminated with Xylene on a Biotrickling Column Filled with Expanded Clay. Sustainability. 2020; 12(13):5412. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12135412

Chicago/Turabian Style

Turała, Anita, and Andrzej Wieczorek. 2020. "Biomass Growth and Its Control in the Process of Biofiltration of Air Contaminated with Xylene on a Biotrickling Column Filled with Expanded Clay" Sustainability 12, no. 13: 5412. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12135412

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