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Article

The COVID-19 Pandemic Lockdowns and Changes in Body Weight among Polish Women. A Cross-Sectional Online Survey PLifeCOVID-19 Study

Institute of Human Nutrition Sciences, Warsaw University of Life Sciences (SGGW-WULS), 159C Nowoursynowska Street, 02-787 Warsaw, Poland
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Sustainability 2020, 12(18), 7768; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12187768
Received: 2 September 2020 / Revised: 17 September 2020 / Accepted: 18 September 2020 / Published: 20 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Global Environmental Health and Safety)
There is limited information on the relationships between restrictions linked to COVID-19 and changes in body weight. The aim of the study was to identify the body weight changes and their determinants in the nutritional and socio-demographic context during the COVID-19 pandemic in Polish women. During lockdown in Poland, 34% of women gained weight, while 18% of women reduced weight. As many as 44% of women with obesity before the pandemic increased their body weight, and 74% of women that were underweight reduced their body weight. In a group with weight gain, women increased their body weight by 2.8 kg on average and around 65% of them increased their total food intake. Unhealthy dietary changes and the negative lifestyle changes that comprised of an increase in screen time and a decrease in physical activity were found as key factors associated with weight gain. A higher risk of weight gain was associated with being obese before the pandemic or living in a macroeconomic region >50% of EU-28 GDP, while those younger in age and carrying out remote work had a higher chance of weight loss. Concluding, the specific conditions during lockdown worsened the nutritional status, which may increase the risk of complicatedness and mortality from COVID-19. It seems advisable to create dietary and lifestyle recommendations tailored to the individual needs of women who are underweight or have excessive body weight. More attention should be paid also to environmental impacts. Both, the reduction of excessive body weight and the maintenance of a normal weight should be based on the principle to eat and live sustainably and healthily. View Full-Text
Keywords: COVID-19; pandemic; lockdowns; body weight changes; diet quality score; dietary intake changes; lifestyle changes; socio-demographic factors; women COVID-19; pandemic; lockdowns; body weight changes; diet quality score; dietary intake changes; lifestyle changes; socio-demographic factors; women
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MDPI and ACS Style

Drywień, M.E.; Hamulka, J.; Zielinska-Pukos, M.A.; Jeruszka-Bielak, M.; Górnicka, M. The COVID-19 Pandemic Lockdowns and Changes in Body Weight among Polish Women. A Cross-Sectional Online Survey PLifeCOVID-19 Study. Sustainability 2020, 12, 7768. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12187768

AMA Style

Drywień ME, Hamulka J, Zielinska-Pukos MA, Jeruszka-Bielak M, Górnicka M. The COVID-19 Pandemic Lockdowns and Changes in Body Weight among Polish Women. A Cross-Sectional Online Survey PLifeCOVID-19 Study. Sustainability. 2020; 12(18):7768. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12187768

Chicago/Turabian Style

Drywień, Małgorzata E., Jadwiga Hamulka, Monika A. Zielinska-Pukos, Marta Jeruszka-Bielak, and Magdalena Górnicka. 2020. "The COVID-19 Pandemic Lockdowns and Changes in Body Weight among Polish Women. A Cross-Sectional Online Survey PLifeCOVID-19 Study" Sustainability 12, no. 18: 7768. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12187768

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