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Article

Harnessing Remote Sensing Derived Sea Level Rise Models to Assess Cultural Heritage Vulnerability: A Case Study from the Northwest Atlantic Ocean

1
Department of Anthropology, University of New Hampshire, 73 Main Street, Durham, NH 03824, USA
2
Earth Systems Research Center, Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, University of New Hampshire, 8 College Road, Durham, NH 03824, USA
Sustainability 2020, 12(22), 9429; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12229429
Received: 20 October 2020 / Revised: 9 November 2020 / Accepted: 10 November 2020 / Published: 12 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing for Archaeology and Cultural Landscapes)
Climate change threatens cultural heritage across the globe. Of its varied impacts, sea level rise is critically pressing because of the long relationship between humans and the ocean. Numerous cultural heritage sites lie on the world’s fragile coasts. Identifying cultural heritage sites at risk is an urgent need, but archaeological research programs do not always have the resources available to conduct large-scale cultural heritage vulnerability assessments. Given sea level rise poses myriad pressing issues, entities around the globe are developing sea level rise models for various management purposes (ecology, hydrology, real estate, etc.). These remote sensing-derived sea level rise models can be harnessed by archaeologists to assess cultural heritage site vulnerability. Here, such an analysis is realized for a northwest Atlantic Ocean coastal area experiencing relative sea level rise and with robust cultural heritage, including economically significant maritime heritage tourism. Combining archaeological and historic geospatial databases with LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging)-derived relative sea level rise models illuminates coastal New Hampshire’s cultural heritage vulnerability. This is informative for risk monitoring, mitigation, and preservation planning, especially for cultural heritage tourism. The analysis also raises the need for discussions around what kind and whose heritage gets priority in planning for future sea level rise impacts. View Full-Text
Keywords: sea level rise; cultural heritage; risk; remote sensing; archaeology; LIDAR; GIS sea level rise; cultural heritage; risk; remote sensing; archaeology; LIDAR; GIS
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MDPI and ACS Style

Howey, M.C.L. Harnessing Remote Sensing Derived Sea Level Rise Models to Assess Cultural Heritage Vulnerability: A Case Study from the Northwest Atlantic Ocean. Sustainability 2020, 12, 9429. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12229429

AMA Style

Howey MCL. Harnessing Remote Sensing Derived Sea Level Rise Models to Assess Cultural Heritage Vulnerability: A Case Study from the Northwest Atlantic Ocean. Sustainability. 2020; 12(22):9429. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12229429

Chicago/Turabian Style

Howey, Meghan C.L. 2020. "Harnessing Remote Sensing Derived Sea Level Rise Models to Assess Cultural Heritage Vulnerability: A Case Study from the Northwest Atlantic Ocean" Sustainability 12, no. 22: 9429. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12229429

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