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Article

A Prospective Study of Cranial Deformity and Delayed Development in Children

1
Department of Psychology, University of Burgos, 09001 Burgos, Spain
2
Department of Psychology, Health Research Centre, University of Almeria, 04120 Almeria, Spain
3
Department of Nursing, Physiotherapy and Medicine, Health Research Centre, University of Almería, 04120 Almeria, Spain
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(5), 1949; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12051949
Received: 27 January 2020 / Revised: 29 February 2020 / Accepted: 2 March 2020 / Published: 4 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychological Development in Early Childhood)
Plagiocephaly, the most common form of cranial deformity, has become more prevalent in recent years. Many authors have described a number of sequelae of poorly defined etiologies, although several gaps exist in their real scope. This study aimed to analyze the effects of physiotherapy treatments and cranial orthoses on the psychomotor development of infants with cranial deformities, complemented by protocolized postural exercises applied by the family. This prospective study on different developmental areas included a sample of 48 breastfeeding infants aged 6 to 18 months who presented with plagiocephaly (flat head syndrome). The Brunet–Lézine scale was used to perform three tests for assessing the psychomotor development of infants, thus offering a measure for global development. The results suggest that plagiocephaly is a marker for the risk of delayed development, particularly in motor and language areas. This delayed development could be improved with physiotherapy and orthopedic treatment, complemented by interventions by the infants´ relatives. View Full-Text
Keywords: plagiocephaly; child development; early intervention; speech development; motor skills disorders plagiocephaly; child development; early intervention; speech development; motor skills disorders
MDPI and ACS Style

González-Santos, J.; González-Bernal, J.J.; De-la-Fuente-Anuncibay, R.; Aguilar-Parra, J.M.; Trigueros, R.; Soto-Cámara, R.; López-Liria, R. A Prospective Study of Cranial Deformity and Delayed Development in Children. Sustainability 2020, 12, 1949. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12051949

AMA Style

González-Santos J, González-Bernal JJ, De-la-Fuente-Anuncibay R, Aguilar-Parra JM, Trigueros R, Soto-Cámara R, López-Liria R. A Prospective Study of Cranial Deformity and Delayed Development in Children. Sustainability. 2020; 12(5):1949. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12051949

Chicago/Turabian Style

González-Santos, Josefa, Jerónimo J. González-Bernal, Raquel De-la-Fuente-Anuncibay, José M. Aguilar-Parra, Rubén Trigueros, Raúl Soto-Cámara, and Remedios López-Liria. 2020. "A Prospective Study of Cranial Deformity and Delayed Development in Children" Sustainability 12, no. 5: 1949. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12051949

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