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Article

Sustainable Cultural Heritage Planning and Management of Overtourism in Art Cities: Lessons from Atlas World Heritage

1
Department of Architecture, Urban and Regional Planning Section, University of Florence, 50121 Florence, Italy
2
Florence World Heritage and UNESCO Relationship Office at the Municipality of Florence, 50123 Florence, Italy
3
Department of Economics and Business Sciences, University of Florence, 50127 Florence, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(9), 3929; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12093929
Received: 2 April 2020 / Revised: 25 April 2020 / Accepted: 8 May 2020 / Published: 11 May 2020
In recent years, there has been an increase in international tourist arrivals worldwide. In this respect, Art Cities are among the most favorable tourist destinations, as they exhibit masterpieces of art and architecture in a cultural environment. However, the so-called phenomenon of overtourism has emerged as a significant threat to the residents’ quality of life, and, consequently, the sustainability of Art Cites. This research aims to develop a management toolkit that assists site managers to control tourism flows in Art Cities and World Heritage Sites and promotes the residents’ quality of life. The research methodology was developed within the framework of the Atlas Project in 2019. In this project, five European Art Cities, including Florence, Edinburgh, Bordeaux, Porto, and Santiago de Compostela, discussed their common management challenges through the shared learning method. After developing selection criteria, the Atlas’ partners suggested a total of nine strategies as best practices for managing overtourism in Art Cities in multiple sections of accommodation policies, monitoring tactics, and promotional offerings. The Atlas project was conducted before the outbreak of the COVID-19 virus pandemic. Based on the current data, it is somehow uncertain when and how tourism activities will return to normal. The analysis of the Atlas findings also highlights some neglected dimensions in the current strategies in terms of environmental concerns, climate change impacts, crisis management, and cultural development plans, which require further research to boost the heritage planning process. View Full-Text
Keywords: overtourism; Art Cities; World Heritage Sites; management strategy; heritage planning; sustainability; Atlas World Heritage overtourism; Art Cities; World Heritage Sites; management strategy; heritage planning; sustainability; Atlas World Heritage
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MDPI and ACS Style

De Luca, G.; Shirvani Dastgerdi, A.; Francini, C.; Liberatore, G. Sustainable Cultural Heritage Planning and Management of Overtourism in Art Cities: Lessons from Atlas World Heritage. Sustainability 2020, 12, 3929. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12093929

AMA Style

De Luca G, Shirvani Dastgerdi A, Francini C, Liberatore G. Sustainable Cultural Heritage Planning and Management of Overtourism in Art Cities: Lessons from Atlas World Heritage. Sustainability. 2020; 12(9):3929. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12093929

Chicago/Turabian Style

De Luca, Giuseppe, Ahmadreza Shirvani Dastgerdi, Carlo Francini, and Giovanni Liberatore. 2020. "Sustainable Cultural Heritage Planning and Management of Overtourism in Art Cities: Lessons from Atlas World Heritage" Sustainability 12, no. 9: 3929. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su12093929

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