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Urban Design and Rivers: A Critical Review of Theories Devising Planning and Design Concepts to Define Riverside Urbanity
Case Report

Urban Rivers Corridors in the Don Catchment, UK: From Ignored, Ignoble and Industrial to Green, Seen and Celebrated

Don Catchment Rivers Trust, Churchill Business Centre, Churchill Road, Doncaster DN2 4LP, UK
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Academic Editors: Nicola Dempsey and Laurence Pattacini
Sustainability 2021, 13(14), 7646; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13147646
Received: 31 May 2021 / Revised: 23 June 2021 / Accepted: 24 June 2021 / Published: 8 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urbanism and Rivers or Riverside Urbanity?)
Research on urban rivers often seeks to find commonalities to advance knowledge of the effect of urbanisation on rivers, and rightly so. But it is important, also, to develop a complementary understanding of how urban rivers can be distinct, to facilitate a more nuanced view of concepts such as the ‘urban river syndrome’ and of the challenges facing those who wish to create more sustainable urban river corridors. To this end we use the Don Catchment as a case study to illustrate how historic patterns of urbanisation have been fundamental in shaping the catchment’s rivers. Following the Industrial Revolution, the catchment became an industrial centre, resulting in the ecological death of river ecosystems, and the disconnection of communities from stark urban river corridors. Widescale deindustrialisation in the 1970s and 1980s then resulted in a partial ecological recovery of the rivers, and ignited public interest. This history has imbued the catchment’s urban river corridors with a distinctive industrial character that can vary greatly between and within settlements. It has also left a legacy of particular issues, including a high degree of river habitat fragmentation and physical modification, and of negative perceptions of the rivers, which need improving to realise their potential as assets to local communities. View Full-Text
Keywords: urban river corridor; urban rivers; urban streams; urban ecology; industrialisation urban river corridor; urban rivers; urban streams; urban ecology; industrialisation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Shaw, E.; Coldwell, D.; Cox, A.; Duffy, M.; Firth, C.; Fulton, B.; Goodship, S.; Hyslop, S.; Rowley, D.; Walker, R.; Worrall, P. Urban Rivers Corridors in the Don Catchment, UK: From Ignored, Ignoble and Industrial to Green, Seen and Celebrated. Sustainability 2021, 13, 7646. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13147646

AMA Style

Shaw E, Coldwell D, Cox A, Duffy M, Firth C, Fulton B, Goodship S, Hyslop S, Rowley D, Walker R, Worrall P. Urban Rivers Corridors in the Don Catchment, UK: From Ignored, Ignoble and Industrial to Green, Seen and Celebrated. Sustainability. 2021; 13(14):7646. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13147646

Chicago/Turabian Style

Shaw, Ed, Debbie Coldwell, Anthony Cox, Matt Duffy, Chris Firth, Beckie Fulton, Sue Goodship, Sally Hyslop, David Rowley, Rachel Walker, and Peter Worrall. 2021. "Urban Rivers Corridors in the Don Catchment, UK: From Ignored, Ignoble and Industrial to Green, Seen and Celebrated" Sustainability 13, no. 14: 7646. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13147646

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