Next Article in Journal
Sustainability Understanding and Behaviors across Urban Areas: A Case Study on Istanbul City
Next Article in Special Issue
Determining Factors of Psychological Performance and Differences among Age Categories in Youth Football Players
Previous Article in Journal
Optimal Operation of Stand-Alone Microgrid Considering Emission Issues and Demand Response Program Using Whale Optimization Algorithm
Previous Article in Special Issue
Flourishing in Young Adults: The Role of Achievement Goals, Participation Motivation, and Self-Perception Levels in Physical Activity Contexts
Article

Initial Positive Indications with Wearable Fitness Technology Followed by Relapse: What’s Going On?

Center of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport, Halmstad University, 301 18 Halmstad, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Sidonio Serpa and Jürgen Beckmann
Sustainability 2021, 13(14), 7704; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13147704
Received: 23 April 2021 / Revised: 18 June 2021 / Accepted: 29 June 2021 / Published: 9 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sport Psychology and Sustainable Health and Well-being)
The motivational influence of wearable fitness technology (WFT) on increasing physical activity (PA) is unclear, and improvements in PA have been shown to be driven by both intrinsic and extrinsic motivation. In the current study, PA (daily number of steps), moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity, and muscular strength training were measured over 6 months on, originally, 16 randomly selected sedentary community workers (mean age = 51 years). Moreover, self-determined motivation (Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire-2) was measured before, midway, and after a 6-month intervention program that included motivational interviewing, as well as the use of WFT and a structured outdoor gym program. Our findings showed WFT, in combination with motivational interviewing, initially helped the participants meet recommended guidelines for PA in terms of at least 10,000 steps per day, and at least 150 min of moderate aerobic activity per week. There was a large decrease in participants’ PA and increase in introjected motivation between the first half (3 months) and the second half of the intervention (6 months). The increase in introjected motivation suggests that toward the end of the 6-month intervention, participants engaged in PA to satisfy external demands or avoid guilt, which may lead to less-persistent behavior change. View Full-Text
Keywords: health; motivation; physical activity; wearable fitness technology health; motivation; physical activity; wearable fitness technology
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Parker, J.; Johnson, U.; Ivarsson, A. Initial Positive Indications with Wearable Fitness Technology Followed by Relapse: What’s Going On? Sustainability 2021, 13, 7704. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13147704

AMA Style

Parker J, Johnson U, Ivarsson A. Initial Positive Indications with Wearable Fitness Technology Followed by Relapse: What’s Going On? Sustainability. 2021; 13(14):7704. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13147704

Chicago/Turabian Style

Parker, James, Urban Johnson, and Andreas Ivarsson. 2021. "Initial Positive Indications with Wearable Fitness Technology Followed by Relapse: What’s Going On?" Sustainability 13, no. 14: 7704. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13147704

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop