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Article

Does Staying at Home during the COVID-19 Pandemic Help Reduce CO2 Emissions?

1
Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570, Japan
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Department of Agricultural Economics, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh 2202, Bangladesh
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Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8572, Japan
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Institute of Agribusiness and Development Studies, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh 2202, Bangladesh
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Giovanni Leonardi
Sustainability 2021, 13(15), 8534; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13158534
Received: 17 June 2021 / Revised: 24 July 2021 / Accepted: 27 July 2021 / Published: 30 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Global Energy Economics and Implications of Energy-Related Policies)
Quarantining at home during the COVID-19 pandemic significantly restricted human mobility such as visits to parks, grocery stores, workplaces, retail places, and transit stations. In this research, we analyzed how the changes in human mobility during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, from February to April 2020 (i.e., between 17 February and 30 April 2020), affected the daily CO2 emissions for countries having a high number of coronavirus cases at that time. Our daily time-series analyses indicated that when average hours spent at home increased, the amount of daily CO2 emissions declined significantly. The findings suggest that for all three countries (the US, India, and France), a 1% increase in the average duration spent in residential areas reduced daily CO2 emissions by 0.17 Mt, 0.10 Mt, and 0.01 Mt, respectively, during the first wave period. Thus, confining people into their homes contributes to cutting down CO2 emissions remarkably. However, the study also reveals those activities such as visiting parks and going grocery shopping increase CO2 emissions, suggesting that unnecessary human mobility is undesirable for the environment. View Full-Text
Keywords: COVID-19; human mobility; environmental impact; CO2 emissions; ARDL COVID-19; human mobility; environmental impact; CO2 emissions; ARDL
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MDPI and ACS Style

Aruga, K.; Islam, M.M.; Jannat, A. Does Staying at Home during the COVID-19 Pandemic Help Reduce CO2 Emissions? Sustainability 2021, 13, 8534. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13158534

AMA Style

Aruga K, Islam MM, Jannat A. Does Staying at Home during the COVID-19 Pandemic Help Reduce CO2 Emissions? Sustainability. 2021; 13(15):8534. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13158534

Chicago/Turabian Style

Aruga, Kentaka, Md. M. Islam, and Arifa Jannat. 2021. "Does Staying at Home during the COVID-19 Pandemic Help Reduce CO2 Emissions?" Sustainability 13, no. 15: 8534. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13158534

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