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Article

The Effects of Pedestrian Environments on Walking Behaviors and Perception of Pedestrian Safety

1
Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA
2
Department of Landscape Architecture, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306, USA
3
Daegu Gyeongbuk Development Institute, Daegu 42447, Korea
4
Low Impact Development Center, Beltsville, MD 20705, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Chun-Yen Chang and William C. Sullivan
Sustainability 2021, 13(16), 8728; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13168728
Received: 2 July 2021 / Revised: 22 July 2021 / Accepted: 30 July 2021 / Published: 5 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Innovation Thinking of Urban Green on Human Health)
We investigated the effects of pedestrian environments on parents’ walking behavior, their perception of pedestrian safety, and their willingness to let their children walk to school. This study was a simulated walking environment experiment that created six different pedestrian conditions using sidewalks, landscape buffers, and street trees. We used within subjects design where participants were exposed to all six simulated conditions. Participants were 26 parents with elementary school children. Sidewalks, buffer strips, and street trees affected parents’ decisions to: walk themselves; let their children walk to school; evaluate their perception whether the simulated environment was safe for walking. We found that the design of pedestrian environments does affect people’s perceptions of pedestrian safety and their willingness to walk. The presence of a sidewalk, buffer strip, and street trees affected parents’ decision to walk, their willingness to let their children walk to school and perceived the pedestrian environment as safer for walking. The effects of trees on parents’ walking and perception of pedestrian safety are greater when there is a wide buffer rather than a narrow buffer. It was found that parents are more cautious about their children’s walking environments and safety than their own. View Full-Text
Keywords: pedestrian environments; children; sidewalks; landscape buffers; street trees; commute routes; active transportation; walking; perception of pedestrian safety pedestrian environments; children; sidewalks; landscape buffers; street trees; commute routes; active transportation; walking; perception of pedestrian safety
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kweon, B.-S.; Rosenblatt-Naderi, J.; Ellis, C.D.; Shin, W.-H.; Danies, B.H. The Effects of Pedestrian Environments on Walking Behaviors and Perception of Pedestrian Safety. Sustainability 2021, 13, 8728. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13168728

AMA Style

Kweon B-S, Rosenblatt-Naderi J, Ellis CD, Shin W-H, Danies BH. The Effects of Pedestrian Environments on Walking Behaviors and Perception of Pedestrian Safety. Sustainability. 2021; 13(16):8728. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13168728

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kweon, Byoung-Suk, Jody Rosenblatt-Naderi, Christopher D. Ellis, Woo-Hwa Shin, and Blair H. Danies 2021. "The Effects of Pedestrian Environments on Walking Behaviors and Perception of Pedestrian Safety" Sustainability 13, no. 16: 8728. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/su13168728

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